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ICED 2019 International Conference of Eating Disorders - NY

When
3/14/2019 - 3/16/2019
Where
Sheraton New York Times Square Hotel 811 Seventh Avenue 53rd Street (Hotel Phone: 212-581-1000) New York, NY 10019 UNITED STATES

Program

   

*Continuing Education Credits

 
Continuing Education Credits Options - Please select either CE/CME below.
Category
*Continuing Education Credits
Time
3/14/2019 8:00 AM - 3/16/2019 8:00 AM
3/14/2019 8:00 AM

AED: Meet the Experts

 
Meet the Experts Do you have specific questions that you would like to ask of established experts in your field? Are you looking for consultation on clinical cases, practice issues or ethical dilemmas? Are you interested in developing or evaluating an intervention to treat or prevent eating disorders? Do you want advice on writing a grant application or publishing your work? If you answer to any of these questions is YES, then the Meet the Experts session is just for you!
Category
AED: Meet the Experts
Time
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
3/15/2019 1:30 PM

AED: Mentor/Mentee Breakfast

 
AED Mentor/Mentee Breakfast - (no additional fee) B Student and early-career ICED attendees are invited to attend the Annual Mentor-Mentee Breakfast, hosted by the AED Membership Recruitment and Retention Committee. The event, which is scheduled for Thursday, March 14th from 7:30AM - 8:30AM, pairs student and early-career attendees with seasoned AED members to talk about issues relevant to those new to the field of eating disorders.
Category
AED: Mentor/Mentee Breakfast
Time
7:30 AM - 8:30 AM
3/14/2019 7:30 AM

Clinical Teaching Day/Research Training Day Session 1 (Wednesday, March 13th 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM)

 
CTD 1.1 Gender Identity and Eating Disorders: Medical and psychological treatment considerations

Speakers: Carly Guss, MD, Amy Tishelman, PhD, Jon Arcelus, PhD, Joshua Safer, MD

Body image dissatisfaction is a common experience occurring in both eating disorders and gender dysphoria. This workshop will cover treatment considerations ranging from the medical and surgical options for gender transitioning to psychological and therapeutic advances that are specifically tailored towards individuals, across the age (developmental considerations) and gender spectrum. Using a variety of teaching methods including didactic, case reports and role playing, the work-shop will be taught by experts in the field as well as patient advocates and will cover evidence-based approaches and participants will leave with a detailed understanding of assessment and treatment considerations for individuals with co-occurring gender identity issues and eating disorders.

Category
Clinical Teaching Day/Research Training Day Session 1 (Wednesday, March 13th 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM)
Time
9:00 AM - 1:00 PM
3/13/2019 9:00 AM

CTD 1.2 Integrating Research Evidence for a Novel Emotion Skills Training Intervention

Speakers: Kate Tchanturia, PhD, Lucia Giombini (PhD student)

The aim of this workshop is to synthesis research and clinical practice on socioemotional functioning in eating disorders. The workshop will be split into four sections, two of which are more didactic and two more interactive in nature. In the first section, we will describe how experimental findings on emotion expressivity and research exploring co-occurring Autism Spectrum Disorder traits have complimented our understanding of socio-emotional functioning. Our systematic evaluation of the literature in eating disorders and related conditions clearly shows reduced expressivity of emotions through facial expression during the acute phase of illness and the presence of co-occurring autistic symptoms in a significant proportion of patients with eating disorders. The most important findings in the area will be presented to the attendees in this section. In the second section, attendees will gather together in small groups to discuss how emotional difficulties and the presence of co-occurring autistic symptoms can make treatment for eating disorders challenging. In the third part, we will share with the workshop attendees recent experimental work which we have conducted using facial expression experimental work and how we have translated this into the Cognitive Remediation and Emotion Skills Training (CREST) manualised treatment package. Finally, we will demonstrate some experiential exercises we have used in emotion skills training sessions with patients with eating disorders and novel possible extensions of CREST, focusing on difficulties with social interaction and how it could be adapted to young people with ED.
Category
Clinical Teaching Day/Research Training Day Session 1 (Wednesday, March 13th 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM)
Time
3/13/2019 9:00 AM - 3/19/2019 1:00 PM
3/13/2019 9:00 AM

RTD1.1 Grant Expectations: Crafting Grant Proposals to Close the Funding Gap in Eating Disorder Research

Speakers: Stephen Wonderlich, PhD, Joanna Steinglass, Mark Chavez, Hans Hoek, MD, PhD

There is significant need for more funding for eating disorders research. Currently, the eating disorders field is plagued by poor treatment responses and high relapse rates. Relatedly, many of the underlying mechanisms contributing to the risk and maintenance of eating disorders remain poorly understood. Despite the high morbidity and mortality rates associated with eating disorders, research for eating disorders remains substantially under-funded compared to other disorders of comparable severity. For instance, in the U.S., eating disorders research receives approximately $0.73 per affected individual compared to schizophrenia research, which receives approximately $83.97 per affected individual. Similar, discouraging trends have been noted in other countries, such as Australia and Canada. Although the reasons behind this gap in funding are multifactorial, such statistics highlight the importance of strong training in grantsmanship among members of the eating disorders field. Successful grant writing requires a specialized skill set, particularly for new investigators. However, many professionals, especially those early in their career, receive little or no formalized training in grant preparation. Accordingly, a recent survey of AED's Early Career Special Interest Group revealed that nearly 75% of members are interested in obtaining additional training in how to write grants. In addition, a separate survey of the AED early career membership found grant writing to be the most requested topic for the annual Research Training Day. This session is dedicated to training interested individuals in grant writing skills and strategies.
Category
Clinical Teaching Day/Research Training Day Session 1 (Wednesday, March 13th 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM)
Time
9:00 AM - 1:00 PM
3/13/2019 9:00 AM

Clinical Teaching Day/Research Training Day Session 2 (Wednesday, March 13th 2:00 PM - 6:00 PM)

 
CTD 2.1 A Hands-on Guide for implementing digital tools in the treatment of eating disorders

Speakers: Shiri Sadeh-Sharvit, PhD, Ellen E. Fitzsimmons-Craft, PhD, Denise E. Wilfley, PhD, C. Barr Taylor, MD

Telepsychology and technology-enhanced services already figure prominently in healthcare and will likely become a staple in future clinical practice. This workshop will provide important knowledge, skills, and experience for clinicians interested in using technology and digital tools in their work. Emphasis will be placed on learning guidelines to determine when technology could benefit clients, and how to assess the client's readiness for introducing technology. Using case reports, role-plays, and practice, we will demonstrate how currently available digital resources can aid clients. The following topics will be reviewed: self-monitoring; online programs and mobile applications; online groups for treatment, training, and supervision; and assessment of the client's use of media and digital platforms. Important clinical issues relevant for the use of technology, such as safety procedures, privacy, reimbursement, and ethical issues as well as the therapeutic alliance in telepsychology will also be discussed. Finally, participants will be able to create a plan of how to implement digital tools in their work.

Category
Clinical Teaching Day/Research Training Day Session 2 (Wednesday, March 13th 2:00 PM - 6:00 PM)
Time
2:00 PM - 6:00 PM
3/13/2019 2:00 PM

CTD 2.2: An __E approach to body image in the treatment of individuals of size with eating disorders

Speakers: Janell Mensinger, PhD, Fiona Sutherland, APD

Individuals of size with eating disorders often face unique barriers in their eating disorder recovery process. For example, these individuals may face pressures from medical professionals to lose weight, experience weight bias, and/or struggle with standard body image interventions. Though treating body image disturbance in eating disorders can prove difficult for all eating disordered individuals, the added pervasiveness of weight bias adds another layer of difficulty for treating individuals of size with eating disorders (Puhl, Andreyeva, & Brownell, 2008). This interdisciplinary workshop will focus on the treatment of body image disturbance in individuals of size utilizing Health-At-Every-Size and social justice principles. Empirical data on the outcomes of HAES interventions and the psychological and physical consequences of weight bias and weight cycling will be reviewed (e.g., Bacon, Stern, Van Loan, Keim, 2005; Pearl, White, & Grilo, 2014). Ways in which eating disorder clinicians of varying disciplines can incorporate HAES principles into their treatment protocols will be demonstrated. Concrete strategies for body image work with individuals of size, such as ways to help clients challenge internalized weight bias, will be introduced. Additionally, participants will work to challenge their own weight bias, as research has found clinicians to hold anti-fat attitudes (e.g., Harvey & Hill, 2011; Puhl, Latner, King, & Luedicke, 2014). An interactive small-group discussion session will problem-solve common barriers individuals of size face in eating disorder and body image disturbance treatment. Ways in which clinicians from a variety of disciplines can work together and collaborate to best support individuals of size will also be considered.

Category
Clinical Teaching Day/Research Training Day Session 2 (Wednesday, March 13th 2:00 PM - 6:00 PM)
Time
2:00 PM - 6:00 PM
3/13/2019 2:00 PM

CTD 2.3: Exploring Three Alternatives and Enhancements to Standard Family-Based Treatment for Eating Disorders in Youth

Speakers: James Lock, PhD, Daniel Le Grange, PhD, Danielle Colborn, PhD

Family-based treatment (FBT) is well established as a leading first-line approach for adolescents with an eating disorder. Despite the strong efficacy of FBT, there are circumstances in which clinicians might also be required to incorporate adjunct or alternative interventions. This clinical teaching day will build participant understanding of the components of these interventions, their empirical support, and practical implementation of techniques. Firstly, we will describe Parent Focused Therapy (PFT), which holds similarities to FBT, but does not include the patient or siblings. We will begin by highlighting the circumstances under which PFT may be best utilized as well as review the rationale, empirical support, and basic approach for this intervention through the use of clinical vignettes (Dr. Le Grange). This will be followed by an overview of Intensive Parental Coaching (IPC; Dr Lock). As early response is well-recognized as a powerful predictor of long term outcome in manualized FBT, a brief module of IPC is indicated when early response is not seen. IPC has been suggested to re-boot FBT and help these patients reach optimal recovery rates. This section will utilize clinical vignettes to demonstrate the core approach and we will review the rationale, timing, and empirical support for the adjunctive model. The final adjunct intervention that we will review is cognitive remediation therapy (CRT). Our research has shown that moderators, such as obsessive-compulsive features, are baseline predictors of treatment outcome. We will discuss the rationale of adding CRT to FBT to help improve outcomes by addressing this cognitive style (Dr Colborn). We will then review the empirical support, core components of CRT, and discuss clinical examples of the application of this intervention. Whilst there will be ample opportunity for discussion throughout this workshop, we will also include time for a question and answer session at the end.

Category
Clinical Teaching Day/Research Training Day Session 2 (Wednesday, March 13th 2:00 PM - 6:00 PM)
Time
2:00 PM - 6:00 PM
3/13/2019 2:00 PM

RTD 2.1: Network Analysis: Implications for Eating Disorder Research

Speakers: Ross. D Crosby, PhD, Markus Moessner, PhD, Kathryn E Smith, PhD

This workshop will provide an introduction to network analysis, as well as more advanced topics on the application of network analysis to eating disorder research. Introductory topics will include the historical origins of network analysis, network analysis basics, characterizing nodes and networks, network graphs, and types of network structures. Advanced topics include network analysis in social versus psychological contexts, network theory of mental disorders, analytic approaches to network analysis, sample size requirements, and replication and reproducibility. Information will be provided on software packages available to conduct network analysis, along with syntax code samples for running these programs. Examples will be provided of eating disorders research questions that can be addressed with network analysis, including questions about nodes, clusters, network structures, and individuals. Ample time will be provided for questions and answers, and breakout sessions will be available if there is interest in specific topics.

Category
Clinical Teaching Day/Research Training Day Session 2 (Wednesday, March 13th 2:00 PM - 6:00 PM)
Time
2:00 PM - 6:00 PM
3/13/2019 2:00 PM

Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

 
W 1.1 - Treating Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) in the Inpatient Setting Using a Multi-Disciplinary Approach

Speakers: Jennifer Derenne, MD, Mary Sanders, PhD, Jennifer Carlson, MD, Allyson Sy, RD, Anne Sinha, MOT, OTR

This presentation focuses on the multidisciplinary treatment of children and adolescents with eating concerns leading to malnutrition and serious health sequellae. Our clinical eating disorders team has long provided clinically excellent and innovative treatment for eating disorders in children, adolescents, and young adults. By necessity, our program has become increasingly familiar with ARFID patients and has developed treatment protocols for inpatient and outpatient settings. We have also been able to identify patterns and differences in the patients with ARFID that present for treatment. This program will be composed of didactic lectures, visual aids, and clinical case vignettes to illustrate principles, followed by panel discussion and questions to solidify learning. Highly experienced Stanford University clinicians from Psychology, Psychiatry, Adolescent Medicine, Occupational Therapy, and Dietetics working on a busy inpatient medical stabilization unit specializing in the treatment of children, adolescents, and young adults with eating disorders will participate. We will discuss the presentations of different subsets of ARFID: chronic patients, which tend to be long term selective eaters, and acute patients, who tend to present as abrupt onset food refusal or narrowing of food repertoire due to acute illness, trauma, or phobia. We will present: the medical assessment of malnourished patients, safe renourishment and monitoring of medically compromised patients, an assessment of growth, calculation of nutrition needs, practical tools for relaxation, acupressure, and other postural and biofeedback techniques to manage discomfort, nausea, and anxiety that may impact the patient's willingness to eat. We will also present the approach to clinical psychological assessment and treatment of ARFID patients, including parent/patient questionnaires, assessment of co-morbidities, and CBT and FBT interventions. Psychotropic medication use will also be addressed.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Time
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
3/14/2019 3:00 PM

W 1.2 - Goals and Targets and Ranges, Oh My!: Defining Weight Restoration in Eating Disorders across the Lifespan

Speakers: Nicole (Nikki) Pagano, MS, LMSW, Katharine Loeb, PhD, FAED, Jennifer Northridge, MD, Jennifer Brown, MS, RDN

The dual purpose of this workshop is to discuss how weight restoration estimates differ for children, adolescents, and adults, and how a multidisciplinary team can arrive at and present a unified message about weight recovery for patients and their families. Katharine Loeb, PhD will provide an overview of what clinical variables to consider when estimating weight targets and ranges for children, adolescents, and adults. Jennifer Northridge, MD will highlight the impacts malnourishment has on growth and development and how to estimate growth potential. She will also explore how to account for height suppression in children and adolescents when considering weight restoration targets. Nikki Pagano, LMSW, will discuss how to communicate information about the growth curve, including hypotheses about target ranges to parents, families, and other treatment providers within the FBT frame. Katharine Loeb will then discuss the psychology of team agreement and preventing and resolving discrepant ideas about weight recovery, and Jennifer Northridge, MD and Jennifer Brown, MS RD will present the perspectives of the adolescent medicine physician and registered dietician, respectively. This workshop will cover special cases, for example when an adolescent had previously been tracking above the 50th percentile or when the diagnosis is atypical anorexia nervosa. Case examples will be provided as a basis for discussion, and participants will have the opportunity to role play / practice how to talk to families and other members of treatment team.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Time
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
3/14/2019 3:00 PM

W 1.3 - "Start Spreading the News" - Acceptability and Feasibility of a New Treatment Approach, "Temperament Based Therapy with Support" (TBT-S): a Workshop Exploring Application and Implementation Across Five Countries

Speakers: Laura Hill, PhD, FAED, Kristin Stedal, PhD, Jody Sark, PhD FAED, Maria Tsiaka, BA, ABD (doctoral candidate), Juana Poulisis, MD

This workshop will commence by interactively describing a new eating disorder therapeutic approach for adults & adolescents, Temperament Based Therapy with Supports (TBT-S) (10 minutes). Subject Sample: TBT-S targets core underlying neurobiological AN mechanisms and includes family/friends (Supports) as part of the solution in the treatment process with adolescent and adult male and female clients with AN. Currently there is no valid treatment proven to be effective over time for adults with AN. Recent imaging studies reveal that individuals with AN tend to have common temperament traits related to neural circuit function which are heavily implicated in the development and maintenance of the disorder. Method: TBT-S integrates neurobiological findings into playful interactive treatment tools, drawing upon client and Support input as they "try on' the tools to help resolve complex psychological and interpersonal dynamics. Participants will learn how TBT-S is being applied across multiple settings in multiple formats: a five-day format in an inpatient facility in Norway; a three to four day format in a blended inpatient/outpatient program in Canada; a four-day outpatient program in Greece; outpatient group and educational programs in Argentina; and in five-day intensive formats for adults and adolescents in the USA. (40 minutes). One to two TBT-S interactive clinical tools will be demonstrated (15 minutes). Results: Qualitative outcomes showing strong acceptability and feasibility via thoughts, motivation, emotion and behavior in the five cultures (10 minutes) will be reported. Quantitative results from two USA sites showing significant decrease in ED behaviors and client/support acceptability of over 95% will be reported (5 min). We will summarily bring the research and clinical information together via an interactive discussion on how applications of portions of TBT-S could be applied at participant home treatment sites (10 minutes).

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Time
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
3/14/2019 3:00 PM

W 1.4 -When Health at Every Size® Meets Evidence Based Psychotherapies: Adopt, Adapt, or Abandon?

Speakers: Lauren Muhlheim, PsyD, CEDS-S, FAED, Rachel Millner, PsyD, CEDS-S

This workshop will discuss strategies for incorporating Health at Every Size® (HAES) into evidence-based psychotherapies (EBT). EBT such as Family-Based Treatment (FBT), Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) are often viewed as the treatment methods of choice for individuals with eating disorders. However, they have been primarily studied among patients in smaller bodies and as they are commonly delivered these treatment methods may reinforce weight stigma. HAES offers a weight-inclusive lens to utilize when treating individuals of all sizes with eating disorders. We will look at the evidence behind HAES and examine how failing to incorporate HAES into EBT can be harmful. We will identify the ways in which weight bias enters EBTs and discuss whether EBTs can be adapted to be HAES-based, or existing treatment models must be abandoned. Together we will problem-solve how to use a HAES framework to address such elements within EBTs as weighing patients, setting goal weights, meal planning, using BMI, and managing exercise. We will utilize a combination of didactic learning, clinical case examples, and facilitated discussion. 1. Overview of HAES and evidence in support of HAES (5 min) 2. Overview of EBT and potential limitations of EBT in marginalized groups (5 min) 3. Review elements of EBT that are weight-biased using case examples. For each we will present the concerns with this technique and as a group problem-solve how to address or modify within HAES. (70 min) a. Cognitive model emanating from "over-evaluation of shape and weight" b. Open weighing as exposure c. Setting recovery weights d. Body "distortion" correction- i.e. body tracing e. Meal plans with limits f. Exercise guidelines g. Reassurance about not making someone fat or about limiting weight gain h. CBT used for weight loss in BED treatment l. Vilification of emotional eating 4. Summarize - do we adopt, adapt or abandon EBT.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Time
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
3/14/2019 3:00 PM

W 1.5 - How-To's of Policy Advocacy from Around the Globe: Becoming a Change-maker in Eating Disorders

Speakers: Millie Plotkin, MLS, Andrea LaMarre, PhD, Ovidio Bermudez, MD, FAED, FAAP, FSAHM, Fiaedp, CEDS, Eva Trujillo, MD, FAED, CEDS, FAAP, Fiaedp, Judy Krasna, BA Christine Morgan, BA/BL, Grad. Certificate in Management

The financial and emotional costs of eating disorders are high, and proper/timely diagnosis and effective treatment are essential for reducing such costs. People around the world experiencing eating disorders and their loved ones face systemic barriers to care. These include cultural barriers, high costs, lack of geographic access and access to well-informed professionals, stigma and shame, and more. Professionals in the eating disorder field increasingly recognize that advocacy for governmental policy change can have a positive and widespread impact on reducing barriers through increased awareness and access to care. In this workshop, we aim to equip clinicians, patients, carers, and researchers with effective strategies for legislative advocacy and policy change. To do this, advocates from around the globe who hold various perspectives (e.g., eating disorder researchers, people with lived experience, clinicians, and caregivers) will discuss how they have achieved successful policy change. Speakers will emphasize the practical "how-to's" of legislative advocacy in a variety of governmental settings (including Mexico, Israel, Australia, Canada, and the USA). They will share their strategies for contacting government officials, developing policies and guidelines, impacting funding structures, and connecting as communities. Participants and speakers will share their insights into advocacy strategies that meet the needs of various governmental structures. Attendees will then be invited to engage in collaborative activities to develop their own ideas for creating change in their local communities.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Time
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
3/14/2019 3:00 PM

W 1.6 - Movement, Speed, and Flow - Effective Use of Behavioral Chain Analysis in the Treatment of Comorbid Suicidality, Non-Suicidal Self-Injury, and Eating Disorders

Speakers: Michelle Lupkin, PhD, Lucene Wisniewski, PhD, FAED

Having a diagnosis of an eating disorder (ED) significantly increases the risk of suicidality (SI) and non-suicidal self injury (NSSI) in adults and adolescents (Kostro, Lerman & Attia, 2014). Suicide is the second leading cause of death in Anorexia Nervosa and approximately one-third of those with Bulimia Nervosa and 12-15% of those with Binge Eating Disorder have a history of at least one suicide attempt (Forrest, Zuromski, Dodd & Smith, 2017). Additionally, rates of NSSI in patients with ED range from 14-55% (Kostro et al., 2014) with 27% of adolescents with ED having engaged in NSSI. (Cucchi, et al., 2016). Despite these alarming statistics, most evidenced-based treatment models do not include a framework for addressing these behaviors directly. Further, given the added risk in treating these patients in an outpatient setting, many therapists and facilities will not treat or are fearful of treating patients presenting with ED and comorbid SI and NSSI. Effectively treating comorbid SI, NSSI, and ED requires an understanding of the function of behaviors as well as factors that may be maintaining behaviors. Behavioral chain analysis (BCA) is a superb tool for assessing these behaviors, however navigating a BCA with a patient with multiple comorbidities requires not only a clear understanding of behavioral principles but also strategies to maintain movement, speed, and flow within a session. Using case presentations, role play, and discussions, this workshop will teach participants how to use BCA to target SI and NSSI in the context of ED symptoms and other comorbidities. Behavioral principles and dialectical strategies will be reviewed to help participants improve movement, speed, and flow of individual therapy sessions. It is hoped that in learning these treatment strategies participants will feel more confident in their ability to treat patients with complex ED.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Time
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
3/14/2019 3:00 PM

W 1.7 - Dietitians using Family Based Treatment (FBT): Strategies and Guidance

Speakers: Marcia Herron, EdD, MPH, RDN, LD, FAED, Anna Oliver, BSc, BPhEd, PGDipDiet, RD, Bryan Lian, MS RD CEDRD, Hala Abu Taha, BSc

Eating disorder clinicians are encouraged to employ evidence-based practice (EBP). EBP is established from research on efficacy and effectiveness of interventions that evolve from evidence-based treatments (EBT), like Family-Based Treatment (FBT). The distinction between EBT and EBP has implications for the use of FBT by dietitians. FBT is treatment of choice for anorexia nervosa in children and adolescents, yet dissemination of FBT is hampered by many barriers. Dietitians experienced in eating disorder treatment and who have studied FBT are a potential untapped resource for expanding delivery of EBP based on FBT. The speakers will describe ways dietitians can be involved in FBT: collaborative use of dietitians as consultants for parents/caregivers, therapists, and the multidisciplinary team; dietitians leading the renourishment aspect of treatment in conjunction with a therapist who focuses on family dynamics and developmental and emotional issues; and dietitians using modified versions of FBT to treat eating disorders. Additionally, presenters will provide training on managing escalating crises of emotion and interpersonal conflict. FBT treatment and dietetic practice in eating disorders is evolving differently in the UK, US and Middle East; differences in the approaches will be presented. Guidelines for dietitians using FBT will be discussed and demonstrated with case studies. Workshop outline: Introduction-Linking FBT to dietetic practice via EBP (10 min), Content- Key FBT principles, phases and strategies; Managing challenging situations; Dietitians practicing FBT, Dietitians as consultants to FBT teams (30 min), Small group discussion (25 min), and Large group discussion (25 min).

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Time
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
3/14/2019 3:00 PM

W1.8 - Ten-Session Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for Non-Underweight Eating Disorders: Key Principles and Key Techniques of CBT-T

Speakers: Glenn Waller, DPhil, FAED, Victoria Mountford, DClinPsy, Hannah Turner, PhD, DClinPsy, Tracey Wade, PhD, FAED

Individual cognitive-behavioural therapy for eating disorders (CBT-ED) is well established as a leading therapy for the range of eating disorder cases. However, compared to CBT for other disorders, it is relatively long and expensive, limiting the number of people who can be offered the therapy. Therefore, a new, brief form of CBT has been developed for non-underweight patient, lasting 10 sessions rather than 20, and focusing on early change - CBT-T. Outcomes from CBT-T are comparable with those of conventional 20-session CBT-ED. This workshop will focus on the key principles and skills needed to deliver CBT-T, using a combination of didactic and role-play methods. The outline for the workshop will be: a) Introduction (5 minutes); b) Principles of CBT-T (25 minutes) - including role plays and demonstrations regarding: engaging the patient in change from the start; the use of protocols; handling therapy interfering behaviours; c) Key skills to use from CBT-ED in delivering CBT-T (30 minutes) - including demonstrations and explanations of the use of: early and rapid nutritional change; exposure, based on inhibitory learning principles; behavioural experiments; weighing; body-image work; relapse prevention; d) Effective supervisory practice in CBT-T (10 minutes) - exploring how supervision can be more effective if it is outcome-focused; and e) Discussion time (20 minutes) - addressing questions from the floor, and exploring how attendees can implement CBT-T in their own clinical setting. The time dedicated to didactic presentation will be c.30-40 minutes.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Time
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
3/14/2019 3:00 PM

W1.9 - From Research to Practice: The Important Role of Reproductive Hormones in Eating Disorders

Speakers: Debra K. Katzman, MD, RCPSC, FAED, Neville Golden, MD, FAED, Kelly Klump, PhD, FAED

There is growing evidence that reproductive hormones, specifically estrogen, play an important role in the development, maintenance and outcome of eating disorders. Although much is still unknown about the pathophysiology of eating disorders, it is noteworthy that these disorders are associated with puberty, suggesting potential reproductive hormone candidates in the pathophysiology of eating disorders. This workshop will provide a review of the evidence examining possible genetic associations between reproductive hormones and eating disorders, and discuss the important role they play in eating behavior, bone mineral density, brain structure, cognition and mood. The presenters will provide a brief summary of eating disorders and the menstrual cycle, including the role of resumption of menses as a biological marker of general health (10 minutes). They will then take a look at genetic and individual differences in hormonal fluctuations and concentrations during key periods of reproductive hormonal change and how this may be a catalyst towards the development of an eating disorder (15 minutes). The presenters will review the role of reproductive hormones in eating behavior and changes in bone mineral density, brain structure, mood and cognition (30 minutes). Finally, the presenters will examine the influence of hormone supplementation on the treatment of eating disorders (10 minutes). Together, the group will discuss implications of this evidence on clinical care. Active audience participation will be facilitated throughout the discussion. We anticipate a very lively session.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Time
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
3/14/2019 3:00 PM

W1.10 - Through the Looking Glass: How to Use Virtual Reality in Eating Disorder Treatment

Speakers: Sarah Adler, PsyD, Debra Safer, MD, Katherine Nameth, BS, Giuseppe Riva, PhD, Cristin Runfola, PhD

Integrating immersive technologies such as virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) technology within treatment has shown to be a promising strategy for enhancing outcomes across a range of disorders (including eating disorders) with results achieved more efficiently. This is of paramount importance when access to evidence based care continues to be a pressing issue. VR/AR enables the clinician to create artificial, simulated environments closely resembling the patient's real world experience, combining the power of in vivo exposures with therapist guidance. This technology offers several advantages within a treatment setting, such as improved ecological validity, skill acquisition, and generalization. With the ability to track body movements and provide biofeedback (visual, physiological), there is increasing inWwterest in VR in healthcare settings, but unfamiliarity with the technology can be a rate limiting factor to adoption. This workshop aims to broaden understanding of how to use VR/AR - what it is, how it works, and what it can do - by highlighting previous and existing work in the eating disorder field. The workshop will begin with a review of the ways in which VR/AR is being used in mental and behavioral health broadly (10 minutes) and in eating disorder assessment and treatment more specifically. We will outline the existing evidence-based protocols for treating eating disorders using VR (e.g., cue-exposure therapy for binge eating), demos of the VR experience, and potential future directions [e.g., attentional bias training (25 minutes)]. We will highlight how VR can measure mechanisms of change (5 minutes). We will use active-learner techniques (e.g., brainstorming as a group, role playing) to guide interactive dialogue about therapist opinions and concerns of using VR with patients and provide specialized, hands-on training in the use of these technologies (40 minutes). The workshop concludes with questions and answers (10 minutes).

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Time
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
3/14/2019 3:00 PM

SP 1.1 - Beyond the White Coat and Stethoscope: A Closer Look at Out-Patient Medical Evaluation of Individuals with a Suspected Eating Disorder

Speakers: Rebecka Peebles, MD, Mary Bucknam, RPAC, Brooks Brodrick, MD, PhD, Amy Alson, MD, Mittsi Crossman, MD, Lisa Hail, PhD Brittany Bohrer, MA

Most eating disorders treatment occurs in the outpatient setting. Individuals often seek relief from physical symptoms as the first step toward identification and treatment of an eating disorder. This presentation will inform attendees about the outpatient medical clinician's thought process in the assessment and treatment of individuals who may have an eating disorder. Four clinical vignettes will demonstrate the diversity and complexity of outpatient practice as individuals present at different stages in their lives, referrals are made by various stakeholders, and presenting symptoms run the gamut from uncomfortable to life-threatening. 1) latency-age child who has fallen off the growth curve, brought in by a parent to see the pediatrician. 2) Female college student with amenorrhea, normal-range BMI, referred by her gynecologist with concern for compulsive exercise. 3) 45-yr old male, referred by his dentist for work-up of severe dental enamel erosion. 4) 29-yr old school teacher referred by her psychotherapist; she reports purging by vomiting after regular meals and drinks wine to calm down after work. All of the above patients referred to psychiatry by their PCP. Presenters will discuss the initial medical assessment, workup, diagnostic process, and development of a plan of care. Additionally, risk assessment, communication of findings and recommendations to patients, family members and referring colleagues, and coordination of care will be covered.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Time
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
3/14/2019 3:00 PM

SP 1.2 - Avoidant-Restrictive Food Intake Disorder: Research Insights and Applications for Treatment and Practice

Moderators: Julie Lesser, MD; Julia Cassidy, Ms, RDN, CEDRD-S

Panelists: Rachel Bryant-Waugh, MSc, DPhil; Nancy Zucker, PhD; Stephanie Eken, MD; Emily Gray, MD; Lorena Perez Flores; Daisy Miller, PhD, LDN

Avoidant-Restrictive Food Intake Disorder is the newest eating disorder diagnosis, introduced in the DSM-5 in 2013. Our field has generated much knowledge regarding the disorder in recent years and our research efforts are still catching up to the demand of this population. Our field is rapidly working to collect data to clarify the etiology of ARFID, to help accurately assess and "subtype" ARFID, and to guide intervention for ARFID. So while we continue to grow and evolve our understanding of ARFID, clinicians and parents are actively in need of information on the diagnosis. This SIG panel aims to provide a forum in which the experienced researchers and clinicians in this field can present their insights into this new eating disorder, providing guidance to parents and clinicians alike. Our panelists include leaders in family-based therapy, psychiatry, pediatrics, exposure & response prevention, neurobiological research, diagnosis and assessment, and selective eating. Drs. Menzel and Lesser will moderate the panel, provide a brief (3 minute) introduction to the ARFID diagnosis, and introduce each panelist. Each panelist will be allowed approximately 7-10 minutes to provide a brief summary of their activity in the ARFID field, highlighting research findings and describing their applications for clinical practice. After the presentations by the panelists, Drs. Lesser and Menzel will moderate an active discussion between the audience and the panel experts. Audience members will also be encouraged to solicit questions of the panel.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Time
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
3/14/2019 3:00 PM

SP 1.3 - Underrecognized and Underserved: Everything You Never Knew You Wanted to Learn about Male Eating Disorders

Speakers: Jason Lavender, PhD, Stuart Murray, PhD, Jason Nagata, MD, MSc, Tiffany Brown, PhD

Despite recent progress in our field, males with eating disorders remain a population that is underrecognized and underserved within both research and clinical contexts. It has been well documented that males with eating disorders often exhibit distinct clinical presentations with regard to core cognitive (e.g., body image) and behavioral (e.g., exercise) symptoms. Such differences, along with the greater likelihood of muscularity-oriented disordered eating among males, emphasize the importance of understanding and recognizing unique factors of clinical relevance within this population. This panel presentation, co-sponsored by the Males & Eating Disorders, Body Image & Prevention, and Medical Care SIGs, follows up from a well-received didactic-focused workshop at the 2018 ICED. Three core aims include: (1) describing how traditional and muscularity-oriented eating disorder symptoms present among males, (2) discussing unique concerns regarding medical complications and care in this population, (3) and reviewing up-to-date findings and considerations for eating disorder prevention and intervention programs for males. The session will begin with concise overviews of each of the main topic areas by the four presenters (~40 minutes). Drs. Lavender and Murray will focus their overviews on traditional and muscularity-oriented eating disorder symptom presentations among males; Dr. Nagata will focus his overview on medical complications and considerations among males; Dr. Brown will focus her overview on eating disorder prevention and treatment with males. The remaining time (~50 minutes) will be allotted to an interactive panel discussion during which questions collected from the audience prior to the session will be addressed by the panelists, and audience members will be invited to ask additional questions and to participate in the discussion.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Time
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
3/14/2019 3:00 PM

SP 1.4 - All Hands on Deck: Fostering Successful Collaborations to Advance the Field of Eating Disorders

Speakers: Kathryn Coniglio, BA, Ann Haynos, PhD, Carolyn Becker, PhD, FAED, Erin Reilly, PhD, Joanna Steinglass, MD, Shirley Wang, BA

Collaboration is a strategic approach to conducting research that allows the field to advance through the development of shared knowledge. By capitalizing on each individual's strengths, collaborators can conduct and disseminate high quality science more rapidly. However, several issues may prevent early career individuals from participating in collaborations. Following a SIG member's suggestion that we sponsor a panel discussion on collaboration, we conducted a poll of the Early Career SIG members. Results showed that key issues that prevent collaborations include: establishing relationships with senior investigators, developing an independent line of research while still fostering collaborations, and persisting on projects that have been stagnant for an extended period of time. Therefore, this panel discussion aims to provide early career individuals the opportunity to: 1) learn from individuals who have been successful in cultivating collaborations, 2) discuss ways to promote successful collaborations, and 3) brainstorm solutions to common pitfalls that may arise during collaboration. Panelists represent a diverse range of career stages and of the types of collaborations that they have established. Panelists will discuss how to build relationships with collaborators early in one's career, how to continue to foster collaborations after leaving an institution, how to develop intra-institutional collaborations outside one's discipline, and how to collaborate with groups outside of academia. The panel discussion will begin with panelists summarizing their advice for successful collaborations. Attendees will create a collaborator profile detailing their own research interests, strengths, and areas in which they are in need of expertise from a collaborator. Attendees will then form small groups to brainstorm ways to overcome potential barriers to collaboration. The workshop will conclude with an opportunity to ask questions to the panelists in a larger group format.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Time
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
3/14/2019 3:00 PM

SP 1.5 - Dialectical Skills and Strategies to Treat Co-Occurring Substance Use Disorders and Eating Disorders

Speakers: Kimberly Claudat, PhD, Anne Cusack, PsyD, Gina Bongiorno, LMFT, Amy Baker Dennis, PhD, FAED, FACT

Substance use disorders (SUDs) and eating disorders (EDs) commonly co-occur. Studies indicate that approximately 50% of individuals with ED abuse an illicit substance or alcohol, and between 17-46% of individuals with an SUD report having an ED. Furthermore, patients with EDs and SUDs often present with additional comorbid diagnoses including mood disorders, anxiety, PTSD, and borderline personality disorder. Research suggests that ED patients with co-occurring SUDs have more severe medical, ED and SUD symptoms, higher relapse rates, and less functionality in their daily lives. Traditionally, evidence-based treatment models for EDs and those for SUDs do not provide guidelines on how to integrate the treatment of co-occurring disorders. As a result, patients frequently receive care in a sequential manner, often needing to address one disorder before being able to treat the other. This is particularly concerning as research suggests that patients who do not receive integrated treatment have poorer treatment outcomes. In recent years, the awareness of the limitations of sequential treatment has led to the promotion of integrated treatments for co-occurring disorders. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is a well-established treatment for individuals with multiple and severe psychological disorders. It has further been adapted for use with individuals with both substance use disorders and borderline personality disorder (DBT for SUDs), thus serving as a helpful, evidence-based approach for clinicians to target multiple problem areas in an integrated manner. In this panel discussion, we will review the following: a rationale for integrated treatment of EDs and SUDs, the biosocial theory and etiology of SUDs and EDs, DBT as a framework for addressing co-occurring disorders, special considerations for the ED-SUD population, and specific DBT interventions for treatment planning and targeting ED and SUD symptomatology.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Time
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
3/14/2019 3:00 PM

Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Friday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM

 
W 2.1 - From Client Vacations to Natural Disasters: Ethical Provision of Eating Disorder Telebehavioral Interventions for Continuity of Care

Speakers: Deborah Michel, PhD, CEDS-S, Ellen Broxmeyer, LCSW, CPHRM, Ashley Solomon, PsyD, CEDS, Karen Schneller, LMFT, CEDS

A challenge that many clinicians face in provision of behavioral healthcare is interruption of treatment due to planned and/or unplanned absences, which may include vacations, illnesses, and unforeseen conditions such as inclement weather. Telebehavioral healthcare may be able to fill the gap in provision of mental health services which may otherwise be lacking. The use of telebehavioral health services has grown dramatically over the past decade with applications in underserved populations, rural areas, and post-disaster locales. It includes various modalities of technology such as telephonic, internet-based, mobile applications, and videoconferencing. Despite the increased usage, many clinicians express lack of knowledge on how to ethically and responsibly provide this type of care, as well as confusion about the circumstances under which they may or may not do so. This workshop will outline 1.) routine applications, which include planned client absences such as illness or vacations 2.) nonroutine applications, such as widespread disruption of services for an unknown time frame due to natural disaster, and 3.) ethical guidelines and governmental regulations on use. Specific examples of eating disorder telebehavioral health services provided around the globe will be detailed. Attention will be given to different levels of outpatient care including standard outpatient services, intensive outpatient programs, and partial hospitalization programs. With respect to nonroutine applications, a case study of interventions utilized before, during, and after Hurricane Harvey in the greater Houston metropolitan area will be given. Open dialogue regarding ethical and responsible use of services as well as discussion of the efficacy of telebehavioral healthcare in comparison to traditional services will be encouraged. Attendees will also be invited to interact with virtual components of the workshop as well as provide their own examples examples of ethical dilemmas.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Friday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/15/2019 11:15 AM

W 2.2 - From Exclusive to Inclusive: Strategies to Make Eating Disorder Treatment Accessible to All

Speakers: Marisol Perez, PhD, Lesley Williams, MD, CEDS

The purpose of this workshop is to improve treatment outcomes for eating disorder patients representing marginalized communities. Regardless of color, size, gender, ethnicity or disability, eating disorder patients require culturally sensitive and weight neutral treatment that understands their unique challenges. We will demonstrate strategies that professionals of varying disciplines can use to adapt their treatment approach and environment to better meet the needs of these patients. The methods used for the workshop will include an open discussion re: the treatment experience for patients from marginalized communities and the challenges faced by professionals when working with them. We will use the audience feedback as a catalyst for sharing strategies that have been employed to create more welcoming and inclusive eating disorder treatment environments. We will review the literature available re: how being from a marginalized community impacts treatment access and outcomes. We will then open the floor to a discussion re: ongoing challenges that exist and how we can be advocates for changes on a more global scale. At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be better equipped to incorporate inclusivity into their eating disorder practice.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Friday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/15/2019 11:15 AM

W 2.3 - The Therapeutic Use of Humor and Irreverence in Treatment for AN: Levity in the Context of a Deadly Serious Disorder

Speakers: Nancy Zucker, PhD, Katharine Loeb, PhD, Daniel le Grange, PhD, Martin Pradel, LCSW, Kathryn Huryk, BA, Gina Dimitropoulos, MSW, PhD, RSW

The use of humor in a therapeutic context can be a powerful tool that can aid in reducing blame, externalizing the illness, addressing caregiver burden, modeling imperfection, and building therapeutic alliance. However, this therapy process technique is rarely taught, and manualized interventions for eating disorders are often silent on this topic or even prescribe a grave demeanor to foster adaptive anxiety. This workshop will elucidate the various purposes and places for the use of humor in the treatment of anorexia nervosa, and discuss how to balance a respectful stance that acknowledges the seriousness of the disorder with the inclusion of appropriate moments of levity. Literature from the broader field on the use of humor in the treatment of severe and chronic illness will be incorporated, as will irreverence techniques from dialectical behavior therapy. Further, we present a series of cartoons that were developed to help in the management of AN aimed at both practitioners and families. We present qualitative data pertaining to the helpfulness and changes in understanding and attitude that occur as a function of considering a dangerous disorder from a playful perspective without a loss of vigilance or care. Further, we present systematic strategies and considerations for integrating these videos in the context of family-based care and parent groups. Sample themes addressed include the phenomenology of anorexia (mind vs. body); different parenting styles and their impact on meal support; the management of driven exercise; the consequences of rigid dieting on food craving; and weight stigma. Interactive audience components of the workshop will include paired practice activities and group discussion.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Friday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/15/2019 11:15 AM

W 2.4 - Involving Parents in Prevention of Body Image and Eating Concerns: Practice and Possibilities

Speakers: Susan Paxton, BA (Hons), MPsych, PhD FAED, Laura Hart, BSc(Hons), PhD, Rebbecca Manley, BA MSc, Phillippa Diedrichs, BSc (Hons), PhD, FAED, Niva Piran, PhD, C.Psych. FAED

Parents play an important role in creating a positive body image environment for their children. They may be salient role models by communicating attitudes about the body, food and eating, or influence their child through direct comments about their child's appearance. In addition, they may mediate the impact of other environmental influences. In light of their important role, parental involvement has been explored in a number of prevention programs. This workshop aims to provide insight into two such programs, and also explore new possibilities. One resource that has been designed to assist parents to provide a positive body image and eating environment for 2- to 6-year old children is Confident Body Confident Child (CBCC). CBCC has also been adapted to provide specific support for parents with a lived experience of an eating disorder. In addition, the Dove Self Esteem Project Website for Parents, designed to assist mothers build positive body image in children, has been evaluated. Further, there are many other untapped possibilities for including parents in prevention. In this workshop, participants will first be provided with a brief rationale for the inclusion of parents in prevention (10 mins). Second, CBCC resources will be introduced (10 mins) followed by exploration of issues that parents might raise using role plays, completing activities in the resource, and small group discussions (15 mins). Third, participants will explore ways in which CBCC may be used with parents with a lived experience of an eating disorder in groups discussions (15 mins). Next, the Dove website will be described (5 mins) and participants will engage in experiential aspects of the resource (15 mins). Finally, from the perspective of research anchored in girls' and women's lived experiences, participants will discuss future possibilities for the inclusion of parents in prevention (20 mins).

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Friday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/15/2019 11:15 AM

W 2.5 - Maximizing Recovery After Weight Restoration via Relapse Prevention in Anorexia Nervosa

Speakers: Tamara Berends, MSc, Sahib S. Khalsa, MD PhD, Angela Guarda, MD FAED

Relapse after treatment for anorexia nervosa (AN) is common, yet we have a limited understanding of the forces that drive it. Heterogeneous definitions of remission, recovery and relapse complicate analyses of treatment outcome across studies, and there is a comparative need for the adoption of consistent outcome measures and risk adjustment metrics. This workshop will engage participants in a practical case-based discussion focused on these topics and will cover three main areas. First, presenters will review the literature on predictors of relapse in AN and outline a recently published proposal for standardized definitions of relapse, remission and recovery. Attendees will be encouraged to provide input and feedback on this scheme through an interactive small-group sampling process to measure consensus and divergent perspectives. The second part of the presentation will review strategies for collection of common outcomes across laboratories and eating disorder treatment programs including diagnosis and patient characteristics, treatment characteristics, key clinical outcome measures, optimal follow-up frequency, and data sharing. Finally, the third part of the workshop will focus on relapse prevention strategies. Relatively few treatment interventions have been developed that directly target relapse prevention in AN. The utility of a pragmatic manualized program, the "Guideline Relapse Prevention Anorexia Nervosa (GRP)" will be illustrated using interactive case-based exercises. This guideline describes how the healthcare professional, patient and family members can work together to understand the patient's individual process of relapse and proactively strategize how to mitigate risk. Data from a cohort study implementing this guideline in 83 patients with AN and demonstrating a relapse rate of 11%, considerably lower than that reported in other studies (30-57%) will be presented.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Friday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/15/2019 11:15 AM

W 2.6 - How to Develop a Neuroethically Informed Study of Deep-Brain Stimulation in Severe Enduring Anorexia Nervosa (Se-An): Which Patients Might Benefit and How?

Speakers: Rebecca Park, MB BCh, PhD, FRCPsych, Jacinta Tan, MB BS, PhD, FRCPsych

To help participants appreciate the clinical and ethical complexity of patient selection and support for Deep Brain Stimulation. We have been investigating Deep Brain Stimulation to the Nucleus Accumbens as an experimental treatment for Severe enduring Anorexia Nervosa. We integrate a neuroethical gold standard into our work. Our data include not only neural and clinical effects but also detailed assessments of capacity, and ethical analysis arising from in-depth discussions with patients and their accounts of the research experience. Our study protocol and ethics gold standard are published and registered with clinicaltrials.gov. NCT01924598, with ethical/ HRA approval (Project ID 128658). A key issue is ethically informed patient selection and engagement. This workshop shares and discusses practical and clinical lessons learnt. We invite discussion and debate on this novel and invasive treatment, and discuss potential pitfalls. We also describe and discuss experiences of the patients who have completing protocol, and that of their families. Detailed data on results is presented in a seperate paper AED submission. In half our patients DBS has been associated with marked improvements in ED pathology and reported as ' life changing' and 'liberating'. There were no serious adverse events or side effects. Capacity assessments and detailed ethical interviews challenged the standard principles of informed consent, with patients speaking movingly about their desperation for treatment . They are thus a particularly vulnerable research population in spite of excellent understanding of potential risks and benefits, rendering selection decisions particularly complex for researchers. Moreover the course of recovery journeys was fruitful but at times challenging. The workshop focuses on issues of patient selection and support during the research and the crucial underpinnings of our neuro-ethical gold standard to guide future clinicians and researchers.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Friday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/15/2019 11:15 AM

W 2.7 - Joining Forces for Empirically-Supported Treatment Models: Family-Based Treatment with Cognitive-Behavioral Models as Follow-up for Eating Pathology and Comorbidities

Speakers: Jenna DiLossi, PhD, Laurel Weaver, MD, PhD, Rebecka Peebles, MD, Melissa Harrison, MA, Eleanor Brenner, PhD

The primary goals of this workshop are to give treatment providers a clearer understanding of how to navigate through implementation of the empirically-supported treatments for eating disorders that we have available at this current time. The specific focus will be on Family-Based Treatment (FBT) and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy-Enhanced (CBT-E) in adolescent and young adult populations, with other CBT models utilized as a follow-up treatment for additional diagnostic comorbidities. Researchers have worked to create thorough, user-friendly treatment manuals for clinicians to implement; however, there has not been much empirical attention given to cases wherein it may be clinically indicated to implement both approaches throughout the course of treatment. Workshop speakers (i.e., Jenna DiLossi, PsyD, LPC; Rebecka Peebles, MD; Laurel Weaver, MD, PhD; Melissa Harrison, M.A., LPC; & Eleanor Brenner, PsyD) will draw upon the current literature in addition to clinical work in a didactic PowerPoint presentation (35-40 minutes) to discuss the following: 1) Assessing when to implement FBT vs CBT-E as the first line of defense for eating pathology; 2) Transitioning from FBT to either CBT-E or another CBT manual for a different disorder (i.e., Exposure & Ritual Prevention for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder); 3) Managing possible road blocks to success. Speakers will engage participants in a group discussion by prompting them to share cases and questions from their clinical work wherein this type of combined treatment plan could be applied (25 minutes). Case vignettes will also be used to facilitate participants working in pairs to identify treatment recommendations and interventions, while workshop speakers rotate around the room for assistance (25 minutes).

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Friday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/15/2019 11:15 AM

W2.8 - Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT): Application to Anorexia Nervosa and the Spectrum of Anorectic Behavior

Speaker: Rhonda Merwin, PhD

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a contemporary cognitive-behavioral therapy that emphasizes acceptance, mindfulness and values in treatment. ACT is increasingly used to treat eating disorders, and although evidence is still in its infancy, results are promising. There have been seven case series (Berman et al., 2009; Heffner et al., 2002; Hill et al., 2015; Hill, et al., 2015; Masuda et al., 2016; Merwin et al., 2013; Wildes & Marcus, 2011), three open trials (Juarascio et al., 2017; Timko...Merwin, et al., 2015; Wildes et al., 2014), two randomized control trials (RCTs) (Parling et al., 2016; Strandskov et al., 2017), and two other nonrandomized studies with a control condition (Juarascio et al., 2013; Pinto-Gouveia et al., 2017). ACT addresses eating disorder behavior by increasing psychological flexibility (or the ability to behave flexibly and effectively in the presence of unwanted thoughts and feelings) and helping individuals clarify and align behavior with deeply held personal values. ACT might be particularly well-suited for individuals with anorexia nervosa who are often high in experiential avoidance and low in self-directedness, and may struggle with motivation for change. This workshop will teach the core principles of ACT and ACT case formulation. Participants will be oriented to the 6 core ACT processes or functional domains, and how they may be leveraged in the treatment of anorexia nervosa and the spectrum of anorectic behavior. The workshop will be presented by a Peer-Reviewed ACT trainer recognized by the Association of Contextual and Behavioral Science. Content will draw heavily from "Using ACT to Treat Anorexia Nervosa and the Spectrum of Anorectic Behavior" (Merwin et al., in Press, Guilford Press). Learning methods will include didactic presentation, but will rely on highly interactive discussion and participants will practice case formulation and experiential exercises.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Friday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/15/2019 11:15 AM

W2.9 - Start Spreading the News--But HOW? A Workshop on Creating a Cultural Dialogue

Speakers: Erin Parks, PhD, Heather Hower, MSW, LICSW, QCSW, ACSW, Michael Cortese, BA, Carrie Arnold, MA, MPH, Lisa Sabey, BA

The eating disorders field is making great strides in improving prevention, screening, treatment, and access to care for eating disorders. However, despite this progress, the majority of schools don't use our prevention techniques, the majority of pediatricians don't use our screenings, the majority of clinicians don't practice our treatments, and the majority of sufferers don't have access to affordable, evidence-based care. As we seek to bridge the research-implementation gap, it becomes more essential than ever to mobilize the public. From mandatory automobile seat-belts, to routine screening for autism, consumer demand drives regulations, funding, and access. But how do we get the public to care about our research? How do we shift the cultural narrative around eating disorders away from the myths, and towards the research? This workshop panel features a blogger, a documentary film-maker, a media executive, and a science journalist discussing how we can spread the word about eating disorders and the evidence-based prevention, screening, and treatments that are available. Workshop time will be spent as follows: 40 minutes--Lead author will serve as a moderator, as each panelist presents on what they've learned within their individual mediums. They will each discuss their communication process and skills, lessons learned, and take questions from attendees about how to turn research findings into cultural dialogue. In the second half of the workshop, the moderator will lead the attendees and panel in dissecting and improving tweets, elevator pitches, interviews, social media posts, and headlines. Attendees will work in small groups to practice their personal elevator pitch and will also craft communication proposals for the Eating Disorders Truths.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Friday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/15/2019 11:15 AM

W2.10 - Times Up: When to Call it Quits with FBT and What to do Next?

Speakers: Chris Thornton, MClinPsy, Annaleise Robertson, DCP/MSc, Kate Godfrey, DCP/MSc. formerly

While Family Based Treatment (FBT) is the gold standard for treating anorexia nervosa in young people, research demonstrates that less than 50% of patients achieve full recovery with this treatment model. Although a number of enhancements to the FBT model have been proposed in recent years, there has been less discussion around when to discontinue FBT and utilize other treatment models. This workshop will draw upon three clinical case studies to spark discussion around how to recognise when FBT is failing the patient and family, and what to do next. We will cover a) the clinical indicators that suggest that FBT is no longer beneficial to the family b) the decision making process around how and when to transition to a new treatment model, c) and how to use formulation and clinician skills/experience to implement a sound treatment framework moving forward. The cases presented will be diverse and will demonstrate how individual psychotherapy, Attachment Based Family Therapy and trauma-based therapy were used to promote further recovery in our patients. An overall relational frame will be emphasized amongst the three cases. Lesson Plan Outline 25 minutes Brief introduction: anorexia nervosa in young people; FBT Interactive discussion: indications that FBT is not/no longer effective Interactive discussion: process in deciding when and how to transition to a different treatment model 50 minutes Case presentations: illustrate how to use case formulation to transition to a new treatment model; demonstrate how three different treatment models were utilized when FBT was no longer effective; the importance of a relational frame 15 minutes Small group discussions: applying concepts learnt today to participant cases.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Friday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/15/2019 11:15 AM

SP2.1 - Neuroimaging Training: Everything You Might Not Know You Need to Know

Speakers: Laura Berner, PhD, Ann Haynos, PhD, Kendra Becker, PhD, Lauren Breithaupt, MA, Andrea Goldschmidt, PhD, Jason Lavender, PhD, Walter Kaye, MD, FAED

Up to 60% of adults who receive empirically supported treatments for eating disorders (EDs) do not achieve full remission, and among those who do, relapse is common. One barrier to more effectively targeted treatments is limited understanding of the psychobiological processes that promote and maintain symptoms. Therefore, there is a critical need for additional research on the neurobiological mechanisms of EDs. Despite the necessity of further research in this area, U.S. National Institute of Health estimated spending in 2018 for ED research will be just 10% of spending for psychiatric disorders with comparable prevalence and lower mortality rates. Training in neuroimaging, a useful tool to pinpoint biological targets that aligns with most funding agencies' research priorities, can assist in advancing the scientific goals for the field. However, many ED experts interested in pursuing neuroimaging training may be uncertain about where to start, or what the scope of their training should include. This panel will guide researchers who wish to develop neuroimaging knowledge and skills, those planning training grant applications, and clinicians hoping to become informed collaborators of neuroimagers. We will first review the importance of neuroimaging training for ED experts. Next, panelists awarded a variety of neuroimaging training grants (NIH F31, F32, and K23 awards; NSF fellowships; institutional awards) will review the essential steps in developing a neuroimaging training plan, including how to: 1) determine what kind of neuroimaging user you want to be; 2) connect with the right mentors and consultants; 3) effectively set up a new neuroimaging study; and 4) learn to analyze and publish neuroimaging data. Examples from panelists' grant applications will be presented. Attendees will outline and receive feedback on personalized training plans and receive a syllabus of workshops and key reading. We will conclude with time for questions and discussion (30 min).

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Friday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/15/2019 11:15 AM

SP2.2 - If You are not Counted, You Don't Count: Best Practices in Population-Level Assessment of Eating Disorders and Disordered Eating Behaviors

Speakers: Katherine Loth, PhD, MPH, RD, LD, Brittney Bohrer, MA, Lisa Hail, PhD, Carly Pacanowski, PhD, RD, Bryn Austin, PhD, Deborah Katzman, MD, Jocelyn Lebow, PhD, LP

Brief assessment tools that are capable of providing valid and reliable data on population-level prevalence and incidence of eating disorders (EDs) and disordered eating behaviors (DEBs) are critical; epidemiological data helps assess which public-health programs are working and identifies where more resources and services are needed. Knowing this, the Assessment & Diagnosis and Public Health SIGs propose an interactive panel focused on approaches to population-level assessment and surveillance of EDs and DEBs. Through a series of five lightning talks followed by facilitated conversation, participants will: 1) learn about assessment best-practices; 2) become familiar with brief assessments currently utilized for the epidemiological study of EDs and DEBs; 3) develop an understanding of how population-level data is utilized to improve ED and DEB prevention and treatment programs; 3) gain insight regarding the unique challenges associated with population-based assessment of EDs and DEBs; and 4) engage in discussion about how to best develop and implement ED and DEB assessment tools into various existing infrastructures (government surveillance surveys, primary- and specialty-care settings, strategic science for policy makers). Facilitated, interactive discussion will occur between each lightning talk, as well as during the second half of the panel. Suggestions for discussion questions will be collected via 1) the AED Online Community prior to the conference, 2) live-Tweet during the panel lightning talks as well as throughout the discussion time period, and 3) direct audience participation. Panel attendees should expect to leave with increased awareness of the importance of public health surveillance of EDs and DEBs, a deepened understanding of the barriers associated with this type of work, and new ideas to pursue this type of ongoing surveillance in a variety of public-health settings.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Friday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/15/2019 11:15 AM

SP2.3 - Good Neighbors Provide Great Treatment: Toward Collaborative Care Networks for Regional Patients

Speakers: Jason McCray, PhD, Jilllian Lampert, PhD, MPH, RD, LD FAED, Heather Dlugosz, MD, Paul Houser, MD

The eating disorder treatment facilities within the state of Ohio have been working together in a collaborative network for several years. Facilities from a range of settings and backgrounds work together to provided collaborative care to the community and offer training opportunities for independent practitioners to ensure an excellent standard of care in our state and region. We will describe how our network functions and the benefits our facilities have seen from the collaboration and offer thoughts on how other regions might adopt a similar model. Representatives from four of the sites within the network will discuss how the cooperative network has improved patient outcomes by facilitating smoother transitions between facilities and programs based on patient needs, level of care, diagnosis and/or optimal treatment modality. The relationships fostered by the network allow for strong communication and collaborative attention to challenges when they arise. Working together in this way benefits the patient and family while elevating the standard of care in our industry. By working together rather than directly competing with one another each site, our patients and the broader community all benefit. Panelists will discuss how the state network provides a touch point for activism around the national healthcare issues being addressed by EDC and REDC. We will discuss the annual conference we host drawing on the expertise of our sites and offering training to one another and the broader community of eating disorder treatment professionals. Time permitting Dr. Houser will present a case vignette of how the collaboration fostered by the network changed the course of treatment for a family facing a challenging and complex situation. Kitty Westin will moderate an interactive discussion with the panelists and the audience about the novel network and its benefits.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Friday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/15/2019 11:15 AM

SP2.4 - Risk Factor Reduction and Treatment of Body Image and Eating Disorders in Athletes

Speakers: Jennifer Harriger, PhD, Tiffany Brown, PhD, Laura Moretti, MS, RD, CSSD, LDN, Riley Nickols, PhD, Sasha Gorrell, PhD, Carolyn Becker, PhD, FAED

Eating disorder intervention efforts in athletes must take into account unique factors, including sport performance, increased nutritional balance, and influences from coaches/teammates; however, many providers feel intimated in adequately addressing these factors with their patients. This presentation, co-sponsored by the Sport & Exercise and the Body Image & Prevention SIGs, has assembled a panel of experts on body image and eating disorder intervention efforts in athletes. The panel will focus discussion on three core aims, which include: (1) improving understanding of athletic identity and unhealthy exercise behavior (2) describing up to date risk factor reduction efforts in athletes and (3) discussing the unique challenges related to treating eating disorders in male and female athlete populations. First, Drs. Brown & Harriger will provide a brief introduction to the topic of eating disorders in athletes (~10 minutes). Next, the session will begin with concise overviews of each of the main topic areas by the presenters (~40 minutes). Laura Moretti will discuss nutritional needs and appropriate fueling for athletes and exercisers. Sasha Gorrell will discuss unhealthy exercise practices in athletes, and Riley Nickols will present on athlete identity. Carolyn Becker will discuss results and insights gleaned from the Female Athlete Body Project, a program designed to reduce risk factors for the development of eating disorders. Finally, Tiffany Brown and Jennifer Harriger will moderate an interactive panel discussion, which will include identifying panelists to answer questions generated from the audience earlier in the session. Audience members will also be invited to ask additional questions and to participate in the discussion.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Friday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/15/2019 11:15 AM

SP2.5 - Screening and Early Recognition of Eating Disorders: A Collaboration of Medical Providers and Registered Dietitian Nutritionists

Speakers: Therese Waterhous, PhD, RDN, CEDRD, Lori Lieberman, RD, MPH, LDN, CDE, Sondra Kronberg, MS, RD,CDN, CEDRD-S, Kortney Parman, RD, RN, MS, FNP-C

Eating disorders have the best prognosis when diagnosed early and treated promptly with effective treatments. While screening for eating disorders enhances early recognition, in the primary care setting, screening for eating disorders is generally absent. Other avenues for screening for early detection have not been widely explored. Given the shame, denial and the secretive nature of eating disorders, they often go undetected. The focus on BMI screening versus exploration of eating behaviors further compounds the problem, as the medical guidance provided (supporting dieting or reinforcing weight loss) is often contraindicated to eating disorder recovery. During this interactive panel we will discuss several problems associated with early recognition of eating disorders, including provider awareness and education, time limitations, increasing demands on medical providers, lack of experience with eating disorders, and the challenge of identifying eating disorder resources. We will explain the use of validated screening tools, and describe several initiatives in using screening tools in non-traditional settings. Original data from research conducted to educate and train various providers will be shared, showing effects of training in eating disorder screening. Situations where allied health professionals such as RDNs took the lead in implementation of screening protocols will be described. Sharing attendee experiences, we aim to identify and discuss possible solutions for implementation of eating disorder screening, discuss and learn from similar screening challenges and create steps to act locally.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Friday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/15/2019 11:15 AM

Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Saturday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM

 
W 3.1 - From a Glass Half Empty to a Cup Runneth Over: Increasing Positive Emotions to Enhance Eating Disorders Treatment Outcome

Speakers: Ann Haynos, PhD, Carol Peterson, PhD, FAED

Eating disorder treatments have consistently emphasized the importance of reducing negative emotions that are associated with eating disorder behaviors. In contrast, interventions targeting the dysregulation of positive emotions have been neglected in eating disorder treatment. However, robust findings demonstrate that low or declining positive emotions (e.g., happiness, pride, engagement) precipitate the occurrence of a range of eating disorder behaviors, including binge eating, purging, and dietary restriction. In addition, accumulating ecological momentary assessment, behavioral, and neurobiological data suggest that eating disorder behaviors may serve a powerful reward function by momentarily increasing positive emotions. Therefore, it is essential to identify effective interventions to target problems with positive emotions that contribute to eating disorder behaviors. This workshop will provide an empirical rationale for targeting positive emotions in the treatment of eating disorders along with potential clinical strategies. For the first 30 minutes, Dr. Haynos will present a comprehensive review of the role of disrupted positive emotions as a mechanism contributing to eating disorder psychopathology. For the second 30 minutes, Dr. Peterson will provide detailed descriptions of treatments that have been used to target positive emotions (e.g., behavioral activation) in eating disorders and other types of psychopathology as well as emerging treatments that focus on increasing positive affect. For the final 30 minutes, Drs. Haynos and Peterson will provide detailed case scenarios and clinical data to facilitate an interactive discussion among workshop attendees. Workshop attendees will emerge with knowledge of cutting-edge research supporting the importance of targeting positive emotions in eating disorder treatment, as well as clinical strategies that can be used to increase absent, low, or declining positive emotions in individuals with eating disorders.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Saturday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/16/2019 11:15 AM

W 3.2 - Interoceptive Exposure: Overcoming Uncomfortable Sensations to Help Regulate Eating and Emotions

Speakers: Heather Thompson-Brenner, PhD, FAED, Nancy Zucker, PhD, Melanie Smith, MS, LMHC

Individuals with eating disorders (EDs) commonly report a range of uncomfortable physical sensations that interfere with eating. Research suggests that individuals with EDs often have difficulty recognizing, labeling, and accepting internal bodily signals and emotional states, a skill known as "interoceptive awareness." Critically, avoidance of uncomfortable internal bodily sensations can interfere with both eating and emotion regulation, with consequences for the development of a stable sense of self. This workshop will briefly present research supporting these associations, and introduce interoceptive exposure (IE) exercises to promote interoceptive awareness and emotional tolerance. IE exercises with utility for EDs and associated comorbidity are used in evidence-based treatment protocols, such as the Unified Treatment Model (Thompson-Brenner et al., 2018) and acceptance-based therapy for children and adolescents (Zucker et al., 2017). In this workshop, we will introduce and practice common IE interventions shown to provoke sensations associated with uncomfortable emotions (e.g., hyperventilation, spinning in place) and ED symptoms (e.g., fullness, tightness), and therapy tools for using IE with adults and adolescents. Next, we will demonstrate "Feelings and Body Investigators - ARFID division," a program that teaches 5 to 9-year old children with ARFID and/or gastrointestinal symptoms to map bodily sensations to meaning and action (e.g., "gut butterflies" are a sign of anxiety; a useful action might be to hold someone's hand) using playful characters and developmentally appropriate IEs. Workshop participants will practice actual IE exercises and role-play therapeutic interactions. This workshop is intended to provide clinicians from all disciplines the basic skills to incorporate IE into their treatment approach. The incorporation of IE into treatment has been shown to augment effectiveness for ED symptoms, emotion tolerance, and identity development.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Saturday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/16/2019 11:15 AM

W3.3 - Not Eating and Not on an Eating Disorders Unit - Managing Anorexia Nervosa From a Psychiatry Consultation-Liaison Perspective: A Multidisciplinary Approach

Speakers: Evelyn Attia, MD, FAED, Alyson Gorun, MD, Joanne Garduno, MA, MS, PMHNP-BC, Ezra Gabbay, MD, Sean Kerrigan, MD, Samantha Knowlton, MD, Janna Gordon-Elliott, MD

Eating Disorders include behavioral disturbances and cognitive distortions that may contribute to different treatment goals being articulated by patients and their providers. Specifically, the relentless pursuit of thinness associated with anorexia nervosa (AN), and the failure to recognize the seriousness of illness that is frequently present in AN may create a backdrop for struggles between patient and treatment team and ethical questions about clinical decision-making may arise. Treatment delivered in an intensive but non-specialized medical setting may add to the complexity of clinical management. The purpose of this workshop will be to discuss the management of severe eating disorders in medical hospital settings. This workshop will use a severe and enduring case of adult AN, treated in a tertiary care medical center, to illustrate clinical principles of comprehensive evaluation, medical stabilization, milieu management, ethical considerations, and transfer decisions to specialized settings. Specific attention will be given to the methods used to assist general hospital clinicians to maintain empathy for patients with severe AN; help clinicians who may be less familiar with eating disorders to develop effective communications skills; work with family members who report care fatigue and burnout; manage the complex medical complications of severe AN; and utilize medical ethics experts to help in the management of such cases. A multi-disciplinary clinical panel of presenters will include perspectives from consultation-liaison psychiatry, hospital nursing, inpatient medicine, medical ethics, and inpatient psychiatry. The workshop will include opportunities for interactive discussion, including consideration of clinical choice points presented in example case.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Saturday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/16/2019 11:15 AM

W 3.4 - Seeking Consensus and Identifying Disagreement

Speakers: Laura Collins Lyster-Mensh, MS, Stephanie Bauer, PhD, Carolyn Black Becker, PhD, FAED, Eric Van Furth, PhD, FAED, Carolyn Costin, MFT, MA, MEd, FAED, CEDS

These are times of global ideological division. Our field is no exception: with substantial divides between varying stakeholder groups and belief systems around ED etiology and treatment. After a ground-breaking event in 2018 at the ICED conference's Difficult Dialogues Session, a standing-room only workshop successfully used the World Café method to bring a room of diverse backgrounds and points of view to consensus on a handful of contentious issues. The process brought up important points of agreement and challenged participants to work together to explore ideas. The results of the exercise were intriguing but begged the question of whether a diverse range of ED-focused stakeholders could identify critically important topics for which there was an inability to find agreement or current consensus so that these topics can be systematically addressed by the AED over a longer period of time. One aim of this workshop will be to identify specific barriers to achieving consensus around this topics. Lessons learned at the 2018 session will be used to plan an even wider participation, more challenging questions, and to model civil approaches to disagreement and mutual respect despite that disagreement.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Saturday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/16/2019 11:15 AM

W 3.5 - Is Abstinence Really the Best Option? Introducing the Safe Exercise at Every Stage (SEES) Guideline: A Practical Guide to Prescribing Exercise for Individuals with an Eating Disorder

Speakers: Marita Cooper, MPsych (Clinical) PhD Candidate, Alanah Dobinson, BClinExPhysiology (Hons), Danika Quesnel, BHk, MSc, CSEP-CPT

Dysfunctional exercise is associated with a range of deleterious outcomes for individuals with eating disorder (ED) symptomatology; yet, conversely, exercise engagement can predict positive physical and mental health outcomes in these populations. As individuals with ED symptomatology often exhibit an array of medical health complications, it can be challenging for clinicians in this field to determine safe prescriptions for exercise engagement. Currently, there is no standard practice for health professionals to manage and reintegrate exercise into ED treatment and, consequently, many health professionals have adopted the practice of recommending abstinence from exercise during ED treatment. However, with increasing evidence supporting the psychological and physical health benefits of incorporating exercise into ED treatment, there is a need for clear clinical guidance for researchers and practitioners. We will work collaboratively with attendees to identify common fears in prescribing exercise for individuals with ED and, in line with this years theme, aim to spread the news of the benefits of exercise engagement in ED treatment. We will then present our Safe Exercise at Every Stage (SEES) guideline, which resulted from systematic reviews of the literature, focus groups with relevant professionals, and feedback from relevant stakeholders (including clinicians, researchers and individuals with lived experience) worldwide. This clinical tool supports clinicians in determining the level of exercise appropriate for each individual based upon their current level of physical and psychological well-being. We will then demonstrate adjunct strategies from both a psychological and exercise physiology perspective to address compulsive exercise in individuals with an ED. Finally, participants will be provided with case studies to practice exercise prescription using SEES in small groups and the session will conclude with time for question.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Saturday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/16/2019 11:15 AM

W 3.6 - Severe and Enduring Anorexia Nervosa: Tackling the Tough Questions

Speakers: Anthea Fursland, PhD FAED, Stephen Touyz, PhD, FAED, June Alexander, PhD, Shannon Calvert

This workshop will describe and examine the complex phenomenon known as "severe and enduring anorexia nervosa (SEAN)". Research and clinical implications will be discussed by two clinicians/researchers: Stephen Touyz, an academic clinical psychologist and Anthea Fursland, a clinical psychologist who conducts applied research. This introduction will be followed by two women with extensive lived experience of anorexia nervosa but who, against expectations, have rebuilt their lives. June Alexander is an author, eating disorders advocate and writing mentor; and Shannon Calvert is a lived experience educator, eating disorders advocate and peer mentor. Each presenter will speak for approximately 10 minutes, then as a group we will identify difficult questions including: how do we define SEAN? Is there such a phenomenon, subtype or diagnostic entity? Are specific treatments required for those with chronic anorexia nervosa (AN)? Do we give up on full recovery? Does recovery in this group differ from recovery in those with a shorter experience of the illness? What does "recovery" mean in this cohort, since it necessitates coming to terms with grief and loss of relationship and life opportunities due to this isolating illness? Should we ever deny treatment because of the complexity/chronicity of someone's illness? Should we give someone with chronic AN the choice of palliative care (quality of life care for a life-limiting illness)? Should we give someone the choice to deny/end treatment, leaving them to die? (If so, at what point? Who decides? Whose wishes should we follow?) We will then break into small groups to discuss these and other controversial questions. The workshop will conclude with sharing the findings from our group discussions.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Saturday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/16/2019 11:15 AM

W 3.7 - Back to Basics: Fundamental Principles of Eating-Disorder Diagnosis and Assessment

Speakers: Brittany Bohrer, MA, Lisa Hail, PhD, Anna Bardone-Cone, PhD, FAED, Jason Nagata, MD, MSc

Being able to accurately assess and diagnose eating disorders (EDs) is a cornerstone of ED research and clinical practice. This workshop will begin with a brief overview of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) ED diagnoses to ensure attendees have a working-knowledge of diagnostic criteria, practice in differential ED diagnosis, and understanding of how to effectively approach assessment (10 minutes). The importance and utility of ED assessment, as well as a brief overview of existing approaches, will be presented. Discussion will cover tools available for specific populations (e.g., youth, males), strategic selection of assessment tools to measure targeted mechanisms of change in research and/or clinical settings, and tips for using ongoing assessments to improve clinical practice and patient outcomes. Panelists will also introduce a comprehensive operationalization of recovery and strategies to best evaluate progress toward recovery throughout the course of treatment to complete the didactic-lecture portion of the workshop (30 minutes). Case illustrations will be utilized to provide an interactive format for attendees to learn about assessment while contributing to the discussion, including 1) Identification of factors important to assess; 2) Case formulation and differential diagnosis; and 3) Selection of appropriate assessment tools (40 minutes). The workshop will conclude with a question-and-answer segment (10 minutes). Participants will learn and practice approaches to differential diagnosis and best-practices in ED assessment.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Saturday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/16/2019 11:15 AM

W3.8 - Incorporating Varied Exposures into Eating Disorder Treatment: From Research to Practice

Speakers: D. Catherine Walker, PhD, Nicholas R. Farrell, PhD, Drew Anderson, PhD, FAED

An introduction will discuss learning principles that underlie different exposure-based approaches and current understandings of the mechanisms of change, including recent research on inhibitory learning (15 minutes). Each speaker will briefly present data from his or her research on methods of exposure that have been examined to augment eating disorder treatment efficacy. Following the didactic portion, each speaker will also include a portion involving a practical explanation and brief demonstration of his or her exposure protocol (8 minutes per panelist). Speakers will be asked to share written exposure-based protocol descriptions to provide attendees as handouts. Exposures discussed will include mirror exposure (DCW translating key principles of exposure and response prevention for OCD to the treatment of eating disorders (NF), and imaginal exposures for personalized eat and body image concerns, such as fear of weight gain (DA). For the last 27 minutes, participants will be given an example scenario and asked to pair up, switching off between the role of the therapist and the role of the client, and practicing different aspects of the exposure protocol, such as describing the rationale, determining what to include, demonstrating the exposure, and planning exposure assignments, with breaks for attendee questions included between each role play.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Saturday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/16/2019 11:15 AM

W3.9 - Evidence Based Care for Eating Disorder Patients: A Guidelines Based Approach to Global Trend, Does it Affect Access to Care for Eating Disorder Patients? A Workshop sponsored by the AED Partner, Chapter and Affiliate Committee

Speakers: Kyle De Young, PhD, FAED, Sebastian Soneira-Argentina, MD, Hanna Papeüová, MD, PhD, Cristina Segura, MD, PhD, Ashish Kumar, MRCPsych, MSc, Kim Hurst, MD

Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa and Binge Eating Disorders are serious and chronic mental disorders with significant impairment of health, high mortality (Arcelus et al, 2011),psychological wellbeing and quality of life (Treasure et al, 2010). In-spite of significant level of efforts being made to improve the care of patients with Eating Disorders globally the standards of care available to people with Eating Disorders varies. There is a belief that Eating Disorders are predominantly prevalent in Westernised countries and one would expect that access to care for patients with Eating Disorders in these countries would be uniformly good. However, evidence suggests that access to care for Eating Disorders patients in most developed countries is variable (Kessler, 2013). It can be argued that the presence of an evidence based Clinical Guideline for the treatment of Eating Disorders in a country indicates seriousness of health policy makers and can be taken as first step towards setting-up a good quality health provision for Eating Disorder Patients. However, according to global survey of PCAC Members, Clinical guidelines are present only in a handful of countries such as Australia, Germany, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Japan, Spain, Denmark, Czech Republic, Norway, Sweden, France, Italy, USA and UK, though literature indicates presence of 33 different clinical guidelines globally (Hilbert, 2017). Some of these existing guidelines are evidence based and others are clinical practice based, some focus on children and some focus on Anorexia Nervosa. There is reported wide variation in scope and recommendation of existing guidelines and hence this seriously affects development of clinical services, availability and access to high quality of clinical care for patients globally. There is a case for global implementation of evidence based Eating Disorder guidelines through WHO, because Eating Disorders severely affect people's health including women's health (Robinson, 2017).

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Saturday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/16/2019 11:15 AM

W3.10 - Working with Barriers to Self-Compassion in Eating Disorders Treatment: Latest Empirical Findings and Clinical Applications

Speakers: Allison Kelly, PhD, CPsych, Josie Geller, PhD, RPsych, FAED

A large body of research documents the benefits associated with self-compassion (SC), which is the tendency to respond to personal distress and setbacks with kindness, mindfulness, and a recognition that others suffer too (Neff, 2003). Patients with eating disorders who learn to become more self-compassionate have better treatment outcomes. However, they also tend to be highly fearful of becoming self-compassionate, worrying for example that their standards will drop and/or that they are undeserving of compassion. This fear of SC is associated with more severe eating disorder symptoms and a poorer response to treatment. This workshop provides participants with a deeper understanding of the fears of SC experienced by individuals with eating disorders, how these fears manifest, and how they can be conceptualized and targeted clinically. Led by Drs. Josie Geller and Allison Kelly, both clinician-investigators with expertise in SC, the workshop will consist of: i) An experiential exercise facilitating awareness of personal barriers to SC (10 min); ii) A review of the theoretical model explaining why certain individuals may be more fearful of SC (10 min); iii) A review of empirical research on the role of fear of SC in eating disorder pathology and outcomes, and the different types of barriers to SC seen in individuals with eating disorders (10 min); iv) A practical case-based exercise designed to promote clinical problem solving regarding how to address and alleviate fears of SC in clients. In small groups, participants will discuss how they would work with a client high in fear of SC from a) a macro, global level (e.g., general approach to therapy) and b) a micro, in-the-moment level (e.g., when resisting self-compassion in the moment). This will be followed by large-group discussion (45 min). v) Summary of how to conceptualize and target fears of SC based on cases, discussions, and empirical research (15 min).

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Saturday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/16/2019 11:15 AM

SP3.1 - The Body and The Brain: New Insights from Neuroimaging, Apps, and Tasks that Measure Interoception and Perception

Speakers: Laura Berner, PhD, Christina Wierenga, PhD, Sahib Khalsa, MD, PhD, Christina Ralph-Nearman, PhD, Eric Stice, PhD, Tiffany Brown, PhD

Many eating disorders fundamentally involve disturbances in the perception and attitude about one's body (body image disturbance) and the experience of the physical condition of one's body from internal signals (interoception). Rarely have these topics been considered simultaneously, though recent findings suggest they are related. This panel, co-sponsored by the Neuroimaging and Body Image & Prevention SIGs, will discuss how a better understanding of interoception and body image disturbance can help to inform the development of new assessments and treatments for eating disorders. The panel will present data and discuss: (1) the neurobiological bases of internal and external body representation in eating disorders, (2) neurobiologically-informed body image assessments, and (3) neuroimaging changes following a body image intervention. First, Dr. Berner will lead an interactive introduction to the concept of interoception and review the state of the field of body image assessment and treatment (~20 min). Next, Dr. Wierenga will present neuroimaging data on expectancy and experience of affective touch in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa (~10 min). Dr. Khalsa will discuss neurobiological approaches to identifying interoceptive dysregulation in anorexia nervosa, including the mapping of responses to cardiorespiratory and pain signals (~10 min). Dr. Ralph-Nearman will present data on a mobile application for assessment of body-related distortions from a multicenter study of individuals with eating disorders (~10 min). Dr. Stice will present data on the effects of completing dissonance-based body acceptance eating disorder prevention and treatment intervention programs on neural response to exposure to thin and average weight models and to high-calorie binge foods and low-calorie foods (~10 min). Finally, Dr. Brown will discuss future directions, how neuroscience can inform new body image treatments, and lead an interactive question and answer period (~30 min).

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Saturday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/16/2019 11:15 AM

SP3.2 - Towards a New Practice Paradigm: Moving Away from the Myth of Neutrality and Acknowledging the Bodies in the Room

Speakers: Rachel Millner, PsyD, CEDS-S, Aaron Flores, RDN, Amy Frasieur, MS, RDN, LD, Mikalina Kirkpatrick, BS, Colleen Young, MA, LMFT

Traditional treatment models caution providers against sharing their own experiences or background during the course of work with clients. Providers trained in these models may feel confident in their clinical skills when it comes to supporting clients in their recovery from eating disorders, but feel uncertain how to proceed when clients ask questions about the providers personal experiences. Body Trust® is a healing modality that gives support and guidance for clinicians to examine their own relationship with food and body. Body Trust identifies that these conversations will come up with clients and that avoiding them due to provider discomfort or uncertainty is not in the best interest of the client. Furthermore, Body Trust looks at the impact of weight stigma and oppression and how providers not being able to name and talk about their privilege can leave clients feeling isolated and not understood. This SIG panel co-sponsored by the Weight Stigma and Social Justice SIG and the Professionals and Recovery SIG will explore strategies for clinicians to utilize to address questions related to their own experiences, background, and body size in their work with clients. We will utilize the lens of Body Trust to inform the conversation which will include a weight inclusive, social justice oriented, Health at Every Size(R) perspective. We will include a brief overview of Body Trust and then each panel member will share their own perspective on this topic and discuss how they approach these issues in their different fields of work. We will give specific examples of how we have responded to client's questions or initiated discussion about our own experiences or body size and share how this impacted treatment. We will then facilitate discussion among attendees to support further exploration of this topic. Panelist Introductions- 5 minutes Overview of Body Trust- 10 minutes Panelist Response to Discussion Questions- 35 minutes Facilitated Group Discussion-40 minutes.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Saturday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/16/2019 11:15 AM

SP3.3 - It Takes a Community: Developing Partnerships for Treatment Access for Marginalized Populations

Speakers: Tiffany Rush-Wilson, PhD, LP, PCC-S, DCC, Norman Kim, PhD, Marcella Raimondo, PhD, MPH

In an increasingly diverse world, we must consider how to serve people from diverse communities in equitable ways and overcome barriers to treatment that exist for those in marginalized groups. According to a 2014 Policy Brief using data from SAMHSA and OMH, Minorities 1) have less access to mental health services, 2) are less likely to receive needed mental health services, 3) often receive a poorer quality of mental health care, and 4) are underrepresented in mental health research. Eating disorder professionals agree that all people-regardless of their backgrounds-deserve eating disorder treatment that meets their unique needs and that our current treatment systems are not working as well as they should for people of all intersecting backgrounds. Prevalence data suggest that eating disorders occur at the same or greater rates across ethnic groups. Among other factors, a history of chronic microaggressions and discrimination and the well-documented confluence of stressors associated with minority status puts people from these communities at high risk for the development of disordered eating behaviors and their attendant consequences. Despite the seriousness and lethal nature of eating disorders for all those affected, there remains a tremendous disparity in mental health services utilization among those from marginalized and minority groups. Finally there exists a lack of diversity among eating disorder professionals, further exacerbating these disparities and affecting the quality of treatment and research. We will discuss how researchers and clinicians can collaborate to embark on addressing treatment barriers to better meet the needs of marginalized populations with eating disorders. We will dialogue with participants to identify improvement areas and strategies for their practices and examine areas of need for researchers using Jackson's "Five A's" Matrix: Awareness, Accessibility, Affordability, Appropriateness, and Acceptability of services.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Saturday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/16/2019 11:15 AM

SP3.4 - Demystifying Misperceptions and Resolving Common Dilemmas in Family-Based Treatments for Eating Disorders

Speakers: Stephanie Jacobs, PhD, Sarah Forsberg, PsyD, Roxanne Rockwell, PhD, Ivan Eisler, PhD, FAcSS, FAED, Lucene Wisnewski, PhD, FAED, Rebeckah Peebles, MD, JD Ouellette, MS

This workshop will focus on clarifying misconceptions and resolving common dilemmas that arise in Family-Based Treatments for Eating disorders (EDs). We will look closely at the key features that define manualized FBT and clarify how these are artfully applied across family treatments delivered in real-world clinical practice. Here, family-based treatments are defined as family therapies that are behaviorally targeted (prioritize directly addressing ED symptoms), are causally agnostic, non-blaming, and focus on supporting caregivers to facilitate the recovery process. While key mechanisms of change in FBTs for EDs remain unknown, the above features form the basis of FBT as it was originally conceptualized, manualized and tested in various RCTs. We have selected some of the most ubiquitous challenges families and providers encounter in the therapeutic process that can be addressed through application of core principles of FBTs. These include a more fine-tuned look at the following elements of FBTs: Joining families and strengthening commitment: Removing barriers to engagement of all caregivers in disrupting ED behaviors. Making agnosticism an intervention: Redirecting and catalysing family action. Externalizing the illness: Creatively bringing externalization to life to fit a family's unique needs, stage of treatment, and avoid common pitfalls along the way. Using behavioral principles to manage distress: What to do when you are getting yelled at, or worse - skills for therapists and families. Assessing and enhancing parent efficacy: Identifying if a family is empowered to restore their child to health. We will engage a lively discussion with panelists from varied backgrounds, offering diverse perspectives on how to clear up such misconceptions. Use of active-learner techniques including role-play, small-group brainstorming and sharing, case presentation and consultation as suited to the topic at hand will leave attendees with practical tools to enhance treatment.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Saturday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/16/2019 11:15 AM

SP 3.5 - Towards Understanding Disordered Eating Following Bariatric Surgery

Speakers: Valentina Ivezaj, PhD, James Mitchell, MD, Robyn Sysko, PhD, Carlos Grilo, PhD

Disordered eating is one of the few consistent predictors of poor outcomes following bariatric surgery; however, little is known about the characterization or treatment of disordered eating post-surgery. Thus, health care providers have little guidance regarding the identification, assessment, and treatment of post-operative disordered eating. The purpose of this panel is to help guide audience members who are interested in learning more about the unique and complex clinical presentations of disordered eating following bariatric surgery. Proposed speakers, who agreed to participate in this panel presentation, will include: Jim Mitchell, Robyn Sysko (Bariatric SIG Co-Chair), Valentina Ivezaj, and Carlos M. Grilo. The lesson plan will focus on 1) better understanding rates of post-operative disordered eating, 2) assessment issues related to categorizing post-operative disordered eating, and 3) treatment of loss-of-control eating following bariatric surgery. Jim Mitchell will introduce bariatric surgery and present data on disordered eating following bariatric surgery among adults and Robyn Sysko will present relevant data on adolescents following bariatric surgery. Valentina Ivezaj will discuss some of the challenges related to assessment and categorization of eating disorders post-operatively along with empirical data. Carlos Grilo will present conceptual treatment models and preliminary data from a randomized clinical trial of behavioral treatments for loss-of-control eating following bariatric surgery. Teaching techniques will include facilitating whole group discussions, PowerPoint presentations, and "Turn and Talk" (i.e., turn to your neighbor and discuss the following questions: 1) what disordered eating behaviors are unique to bariatric surgery patients; 2) what are some challenges of assessing binge-eating among post-operative bariatric patients; 3) what treatment approaches might work best for post-operative disordered eating). Lessons will be 30 minutes each.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Saturday 11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
3/16/2019 11:15 AM

European Chapter Events

 
European Chapter Symposium Registration
Category
European Chapter Events
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
3/13/2019 1:00 PM

HLA Chapter Events

 
HLA Chapter Educational Meeting Registration
Category
HLA Chapter Events
Time
9:00 AM - 1:00 PM
3/13/2019 9:00 AM

Optional Event Participation

 
I will be attedning the Opening Reception on Thursday, March 14th from 6:45 PM to 8:15 PM
Category
Optional Event Participation
Time
6:45 PM - 8:15 PM
3/14/2019 6:45 PM

All AED members are welcome and encouraged to attend this breakfast meeting, where the annual elections take place followed by the presentation of the 2019 fellowships, grants, sponsorships, awards and the Class of 2019 AED Fellows are presented.
Category
Optional Event Participation
Time
8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
3/16/2019 8:00 AM

Bringing Evidence-Based Practices to the People and Places that Need Them: Diverse Perspectives on Implementation Science

Session co-chairs/moderators: Kelly Bhatnagar, PhD, Allison Kelly, PhD

Center for Evidence-Based Treatment, Moreland Hills, OH, USA; 2University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada

As the final event of the International Conference on Eating Disorders, the Research-Practice Think Tank provides an opportunity for reflection and discussion of issues that are critical to conference attendees. The Think Tank aims to promote research-practice integration (RPI) in our field. The 2019 Think Tank will focus on implementation science. Implementation science is "the scientific study of methods to promote the systematic uptake of research findings and other evidence-based practices into routine practice, and, hence, to improve the quality and effectiveness of health services" (Bauer, 2015). Specifically, the Think Tank will center around how researchers, clinicians, and consumers can work together to facilitate the uptake of evidence-based practice internationally, in a diversity of settings and with a diversity of people.

Category
Optional Event Participation
Time
5:00 PM - 6:45 PM
3/16/2019 5:00 PM

Attendee Closing Social Event Tickets - An Old Irish Tavern
Category
Optional Event Participation
Time
7:00 PM - 11:59 PM
3/16/2019 7:00 PM

Guest Closing Social Event Tickets - An Old Irish Tavern
Category
Optional Event Participation
Time
7:00 PM - 11:59 PM
3/16/2019 7:00 PM

Session Recordings Options

 
1-Day ICED Session Recordings - Enhance your conference experience by adding video & slides for the educational sessions presented for the duration of your registration. Please let us know the day you wish to recieve below

Category
Session Recordings Options
3/16/2019

2-Day ICED Session Recordings - Enhance your conference experience by adding video & slides for the educational sessions presented for the duration of your registration. Please let us know the days you wish to recieve below.

Category
Session Recordings Options
3/16/2019

CTD/RTD ICED Session Recording - Enhance your conference experience by adding video & slides for the educational sessions presented for the duration of your registration. Please let us know which you wish to recieve below.
Category
Session Recordings Options
3/16/2019

Full ICED Session Recordsings - Enhance your conference experience by adding video & slides for the educational sessions presented for the duration of your registration.
Category
Session Recordings Options
3/16/2019

SIG Annual Meetings: March 14th 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

 
SAM 1.1: Bariatric
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 14th 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
Time
1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
3/14/2019 1:45 PM

SAM 1.2: Body Image and Prevention
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 14th 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
Time
1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
3/14/2019 1:45 PM

SAM 1.3: Family Based Treatment
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 14th 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
Time
1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
3/14/2019 1:45 PM

SAM 1.4: Genes & Environment
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 14th 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
Time
1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
3/14/2019 1:45 PM

SAM 1.5: Medical Care
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 14th 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
Time
1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
3/14/2019 1:45 PM

SAM 1.6: Neuroimaging
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 14th 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
Time
1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
3/14/2019 1:45 PM

SAM 1.7: Somatic & Somatically Oriented Therapies
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 14th 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
Time
1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
3/14/2019 1:45 PM

SAM 1.8: Sport & Exercise
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 14th 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
Time
1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
3/14/2019 1:45 PM

SAM 1.9: Substance-Related & Addictive Disorders
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 14th 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
Time
1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
3/14/2019 1:45 PM

SAM 1.10: Technology & Innovations
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 14th 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
Time
1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
3/14/2019 1:45 PM

SAM 1.11: Transcultural
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 14th 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
Time
1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
3/14/2019 1:45 PM

SAM 1.12: Trauma
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 14th 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
Time
1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
3/14/2019 1:45 PM

SAM 1.13: Universities
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 14th 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
Time
1:45 PM - 2:45 PM
3/14/2019 1:45 PM

SIG Annual Meetings: March 16th 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

 
SAM 2.1: Assessment & Diagnosis
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 16th 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
Time
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
3/16/2019 1:30 PM

SAM 2.2: Child & Adolescent
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 16th 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
Time
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
3/16/2019 1:30 PM

SAM 2.3: Dialectical Behavior Therapy
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 16th 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
Time
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
3/16/2019 1:30 PM

SAM 2.4: Early Career
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 16th 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
Time
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
3/16/2019 1:30 PM

SAM 2.5: Epidemiology & Public Health
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 16th 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
Time
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
3/16/2019 1:30 PM

SAM 2.6: Males & Eating Disorders
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 16th 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
Time
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
3/16/2019 1:30 PM

SAM 2.7: Neuropsychology
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 16th 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
Time
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
3/16/2019 1:30 PM

SAM 2.8: Nutrition
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 16th 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
Time
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
3/16/2019 1:30 PM

SAM 2.9: Professionals & Recovery
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 16th 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
Time
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
3/16/2019 1:30 PM

SAM 2.10: Psychodynamic & Integrated Psychotherapies
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 16th 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
Time
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
3/16/2019 1:30 PM

SAM 2.11: Residential & Inpatient
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 16th 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
Time
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
3/16/2019 1:30 PM

SAM 2.12: Stakeholders United
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 16th 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
Time
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
3/16/2019 1:30 PM

SAM 2.13: Weight Stigma and Social Justice
Category
SIG Annual Meetings: March 16th 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
Time
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
3/16/2019 1:30 PM

Spouse/Guest Registration

 
Spouse/Guest Registration Fee - this rate is applicable only to attendees outside of the eating disorders field and includes: admission to the keynote address, exhibit hall, poster sessions and Welcome Reception.
Category
Spouse/Guest Registration
Time
3/14/2019 8:00 AM - 3/16/2019 5:00 PM
3/14/2019 8:00 AM