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ICED 2018 Innovation -Expanding Our Community & Perspectives

                                                                         

The Academy for Eating Disorders (AED) invites you to help celebrate its 25th Anniversary, and participate in the 2018 International Conference on Eating Disorders (ICED), April 19-21, 2018, at the Chicago Downtown Magnificent Mile, in Chicago, IL, USA.

Registration Information:
 Pricing and a registration form are included in the Preliminary Program, which can be downloaded here.
This year, the AED offers delegates the opportunity to enhance their registration by adding slides and audio for all of the educational session, as well as an opportunity to win a FREE 2019 ICED registration. Fees for Enhanced Registration are noted below the general registration options, and are available for one-day, two-days, and the full conference. Audio and slides provided through the enhanced registration fee are not refundable once purchased.

Substitutions: Substitutions are allowed at any time but must be submitted in writing and must be of the same member status.

Cancellation Policy: Notification of cancellation must be submitted in writing. Cancellations received by March 31, 2018, will be refunded, less a $75 USD cancellation fee, and any enhanced registration fee paid. 

Hotel and Travel: Follow this link to reserve your hotel room, take advantage of airline discounts, and find additional travel information.

Questions About Registration: If you have questions about registration, please send email to: info@aedweb.org

 

When
4/18/2018 - 4/21/2018
Where
Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile
540 N Michigan Ave
Phone:1+ (312) 836-0100
Chicago, IL 60611 United States

Program

   

*Continuing Education Credits

 
Continuing Education Credits Options - Please select either CE/CME below.
Category
*Continuing Education Credits
Time
4/18/2018 8:00 AM - 4/21/2018 8:00 AM
4/18/2018 8:00 AM

Clinical Teaching Day (CTD 1.1 - CTD 1.4)

 
CTD 1.1 Update on the Neurobiology of Eating Disorders and Implications for Clinical Practice

Speakers: Laura A. Berner, PhD, Deborah R. Glasofer, PhD, Joanna E. Steinglass, MD, B. Timothy Walsh, MD, FAED

Neuroscience offers the possibility of advancing treatment of psychiatric illnesses through improved understanding of pathophysiology. Specifically, current work in neuroscience yields promising new avenues for understanding the biology of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. By understanding the brain activity that underlies decisions about eating (i.e., choosing what to eat) and the control of behavior, we have learned that there are important neurobiological differences that are present during the course of illness. Neural circuits guiding behavior are different in the ill state. Intervention strategies that take this neurobiology into account may be useful. Based on these findings, treatment tools that focus on the habitual nature of eating disorder behaviors have been developed and tested in anorexia nervosa, and targeted treatment approaches are being developed and tested in bulimia nervosa. After providing an overview of neuroimaging updates, and specifically the data that related to maladaptive eating patterns, neuroscience-based interventions for anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa will be presented and practiced. Presentations will emphasize 1) recent understandings of restrictive eating and related treatment approaches for anorexia nervosa; 2) altered self-regulatory control circuits in bulimia nervosa. We will provide examples of how to convey this science to patients and their families, and describe how this neurobiological framework can be used to guide novel interventions.

Category
Clinical Teaching Day (CTD 1.1 - CTD 1.4)
Time
2:00 PM - 6:00 PM
4/18/2018 2:00 PM
CTD 1.2 Best Practices for Assessing and Treating Adolescents with Atypical Anorexia Nervosa

Speakers: Gina Dimitropoulos, MSW, PhD, RSW, Elizabeth K Hughes, DPhil, Katharine L Loeb, PhD, Andrea Garber, PhD, April S. Elliott MD, FRCP(C), FSAHM, Ellie E. Vyver, MD, FRCPC, FAAP, Melissa Kimber, PhD, RSW, and Daniel Le Grange, PhD, FAED

A growing number of young people are presenting with Atypical Anorexia Nervosa (AN). Atypical AN has been to shown to be psychologically, medically and socially impairing. Yet, atypical AN is less likely than typical AN to be identified as warranting medical and psychiatric attention. Although weight loss is often extreme, adolescents with atypical AN are not likely to receive timely health and mental health services because they may have started at a higher weight or present at a weight that is not typically as low as those with AN. The first aim of this workshop is to provide a comprehensive overview of how to conduct diagnostic, nutritional and medical assessments of adolescents with atypical AN. The second aim of this workshop is to present different treatment approaches available for young people and their families. A brief overview of published literature on different physiological and psychological presentations between typical and atypical AN in adolescents will be provided. A discussion of diagnostic assessments used to accurately determine and differentiate atypical AN from typical AN and from other eating disorders will be conducted. Assessment protocols for determining malnutrition and medical complications associated with atypical AN will be illustrated using various vignettes. This workshop will describe different clinical approaches including an adapted version of Family based treatment for atypical AN. A discussion of how to engage and sustain parental (and team) involvement in treatment when the restrictive eating behaviors appear transient and the degree of weight loss less alarming because the young person is not "underweight" will be discussed. Special emphasis will be placed on strategies for strengthening collaboration between pediatricians and clinicians to engage adolescents whose weight loss may have been encouraged or positively reinforced by others including some health care providers.
Category
Clinical Teaching Day (CTD 1.1 - CTD 1.4)
Time
2:00 PM - 6:00 PM
4/18/2018 2:00 PM
CTD 1.3 Strategies for Managing Slow Progress in Adult and Adolescent Eating Disorders Clients

Speakers: Lucene Wisniewski, PhD, FAED, Patricia Fallon, PhD, FAED, Kamryn T Eddy, PhD, FAED

Existing evidence based treatments (EBTs) result in recovery in approximately half of individuals with bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder, and even fewer in individuals with anorexia nervosa. Furthermore, standardized EBTs do not exist for patients who have not responded to treatment over an extended period of time. This conundrum is true for adults as well as adolescents and children who experience eating disorders. Clinicians are nonetheless faced with the daunting task of trying to help patients suffering from psychiatry's most lethal illness, and to figure out next steps when a client does not respond to initial interventions. The current workshop highlights how experienced therapists can systematically employ variety of EBT techniques for adult, adolescent and children with severe, long-term eating disorder and its co-morbidities within a model of attachment and collaboration. Through case presentations, didactic information and group discussion, this workshop will help make the participant aware of the practice of utilizing a wide variety of EBT techniques in a systematic manner guided by clinical expertise and supported by a therapy relationship of collaboration and attachment. Attendees should have some familiarity with CBT, DBT, FBT, exposure techniques for anxiety, and behavioral activation.

Category
Clinical Teaching Day (CTD 1.1 - CTD 1.4)
Time
2:00 PM - 6:00 PM
4/18/2018 2:00 PM
CTD 1.4 Nutrition Essentials for Clinicians Treating Eating Disorders

Speakers: Marcia Herrin, EdD, MPH, RD, FAED, Jillian Lampert, PhD, RD, MPH, FAED, Andrea Garber, PhD, RD

Clinicians working in eating disorders require a fundamental understanding of nutrition principles and interventions. Nevertheless, medical providers, psychologists, psychiatrists, and non-specialist dietitians do not necessarily have knowledge of the nutrition issues relevant to eating disorders. In treatment approaches that do not include a defined role for dietitians, [e.g., family-based treatment (FBT)], dietary and nutritional issues are considered core clinical skills for all practitioners. Yet, the lack of knowledge of nutrition and dietetic interventions has interfered with implementation of FBT by mental health providers. For interdisciplinary teams that do include dietitians, it is crucial for all providers to have common understanding of the role of dietitian and nutrition in recovery. For those that do not, lack of this expertise and knowledge must be addressed. This teaching day, designed for a variety of treatment providers (e.g., dietitians, psychotherapists, psychiatrists, physicians, and primary care providers), will provide a comprehensive overview malnutrition and the skills needed to assess nutritional status and promote nutritional rehabilitation for patients with eating disorders. The faculty will describe evidence-based approaches and their own clinically-refined tools for managing food and weight-related issues. Nutrition counseling interventions derived from cognitive behavioral therapy, dialectical behavioral therapy, and family-based treatment techniques will be demonstrated. State of the art nutrition and weight assessment guidelines, growth trajectories and energy needs, micronutrient deficiencies and requirements, practical clinical techniques for managing refeeding, weight restoration, bingeing, purging, exercise, special nutritional needs (e.g. diabetes, allergies, etc.) as well as food guidance approaches will be summarized. Nutrition issues specific to different levels of care will be examined and gaps in research will be identified. Audience members will participate in case discussions throughout the day.

Category
Clinical Teaching Day (CTD 1.1 - CTD 1.4)
Time
2:00 PM - 6:00 PM
4/18/2018 2:00 PM

Clinical Teaching Day (CTD 1.5) - Extended Session

 
Clinical Teaching Day Extended Session Workshop Registration (CTD 1.5) - Participation in the AED Clinical Teaching Extended Day on Wednesday, April 18th, requires a separate registration fee. The extended session is from 1:00 PM - 6:00 PM EST.

**NOTE: if you select the Extended CTD 1.5, you can not register for any of the other CTD 1.1-1.4 sessions.

Title: Using Exposure to Treat Anxiety in the Context of Eating Disorders: Petrified Patients and Anxious Clinicians

Speakers: Carolyn Black Becker, PhD, FAED, Glenn Waller, DPhil, FAED, Kelly Vitousek, PhD

Exposure therapy is a key component of evidence-based treatment for both eating disorders (EDs) and anxiety-based disorders (AbD: including PTSD and OCD), which often co-occur. Successful treatment of EDs sometimes yields remission of comorbid anxiety, but not always. In these cases, ED therapists need to be prepared to treat anxiety directly. Although exposure is widely recognized to be highly effective at reducing anxiety, be it in the context of an ED, AbD, or both, remarkably few clinicians use exposure. Exposure can be delivered in everyday practice; yet it often is delivered in ways that omit key elements, which reduces effectiveness. One common reason for this omission is clinicians' fear of distressing patients. This workshop will detail the rationale for exposure in ED and AbD treatment, how it works, and why it requires both patients and therapists tolerating their own anxiety and overcoming safety and avoidance behaviors. Case examples will be used throughout the workshop.

Category
Clinical Teaching Day (CTD 1.5) - Extended Session
Time
1:00 PM - 6:00 PM
4/18/2018 1:00 PM

Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday

 
W 1.1 - Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Rumination Disorder (CBT-RD) 

Speakers: Hellen Murray, BA and Jennifer Thomas, PhD, FAED  

Rumination disorder (RD) is characterized by effortless, repeated regurgitation with subsequent re-chewing, re-swallowing, or spitting out of recently ingested food material. RD can occur alone or be comorbid with other eating disorders, particularly disorders characterized by self-induced vomiting. A wide variety of strategies have been reported for the treatment of RD, but no evidence-based treatment protocol exists. We recently developed and manualized a novel, brief treatment—Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for RD (CBT-RD)—which we are testing in an open trial at Drexel University and Massachusetts General Hospital. CBT-RD is offered in individual or family-supported format over 5 to 8 sessions and comprises four components: (1) psychoeducation and self-monitoring; (2) diaphragmatic breathing as a habit reversal strategy; (3) addressing maintaining mechanisms of residual RD episodes (e.g., rumination urge management, behavioral experimentation for learned associations with foods); and (4) relapse prevention. We recently published a case report describing the successful treatment of a patient with RD and comorbid binge eating in the International Journal of Eating Disorders. Although we are still testing CBT-RD formally for efficacy, we have achieved promising results in clinical practice, and our workshop will fulfill the critical need of clinicians who are already seeing such patients and have no resources on which to base treatment plans. Our interactive workshop will begin with a brief didactic description of the rationale for and goals of CBT-RD and detailed case examples drawn from a heterogeneous group of children and adults who have benefitted from this treatment (35 min). We will use role-plays and experiential exercises (e.g., creating a timeline of rumination, diaphragmatic breathing instruction and practice) to demonstrate CBT-RD techniques (40 min). We will leave ample time for questions and discussion at the workshop’s conclusion (15 min).
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday
Time
2:15 PM - 3:45 PM
4/19/2018 2:15 PM
W 1.2 - It Takes Two (or More): Developing Win-Win Collaborations to Solve "Big Problems" and Advance Our Field

Speakers: Laura Eickman, PsyD, Jenny Lundgren, PhD

Our field faces "big problems," defined as those involving universal concerns and requiring collaboration from multiples disciplines and stakeholders. Global access to care and the amelioration of stigma and discrimination are examples of such "big problems" our field faces. Simultaneously, recent ICEDs have highlighted emerging and long-entrenched differences in world views, such as difficult conversations across the eating disorder and obesity disciplines and the research-practice gap. In order to create change in our field, we have to change our approach from one based on competition and silos to one of collaboration. Collaboration, involving multiple and diverse voices and experiences, has the potential to empower and invigorate our field to take significant strides in our shared goals of understanding, preventing, and treating eating disorders. Using their successful experience as community and academic collaborators as a model, Drs. Laura Eickman (Founder of REbeL Peer Education, a non-profit eating disorder prevention organization) and Jenny Lundgren (Professor of Psychology at the University of Missouri-Kansas City) will encourage workshop participants (e.g., clinicians, researchers, advocates) to discuss their apprehension about collaborating with professionals whose focus or worldview is different from their own, work in groups to brainstorm ways in which "big problems" in our field can be approached through collaboration, discuss ways in which participants can take action toward increasing collaboration in their own communities, and solicit ideas about ways in which the AED as an organization can foster such collaborations.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday
Time
2:15 PM - 3:45 PM
4/19/2018 2:15 PM
W 1.3 - Best Practices in Eating Disorder Management for Transgender and Gender Non-binary Individuals

Speakers: Mary Bowman, MSN, RN, WHNP-BC, and Scout Bratt, MSE

This workshop will outline important terminology and concepts related to gender identity (15 minutes), review the existing research on management of eating disorders in the transgender population (10 minutes), establish current best practices for gender-affirming eating disorder management (15 minutes), and aid in the development of gender-inclusive clinical practice changes for participants to apply in their practice settings (50 minutes). The workshop will include collaborative activities between participants and the presenters in each portion of the workshop with the bulk of the time spent identifying improvement areas and strategies for participants' practice setting through guided individual reflections, small group discussion, and role-playing. Participants will have the opportunity to explore questions regarding client interactions and provide one another with feedback. There are no established guidelines for the management of eating disorders in the transgender and gender non-binary populations. The limited research available suggests that transgender people may suffer disproportionately from body dysmorphia and disordered eating compared to the cisgender population. Broad health disparities exist for the transgender community, and the attempted suicide rate among trans individuals is five-to-ten times greater than the general population. As eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness, a transgender person with an eating disorder is at extreme mortal risk. The presenters will incorporate their professional experiences with transgender individuals as a primary care provider and an adolescent sexual health educator to inform the content of the workshop with the goal of creating more gender-inclusive and transgender-friendly eating disorder management practices for participants.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday
Time
2:15 PM - 3:45 PM
4/19/2018 2:15 PM
W 1.4 - Multi Family Therapy: A Novel Approach for Working with Young Adults with Anorexia Nervosa

Speakers: Ivan Eisler, PhD, FAED, Stephanie Knatz Peck, PhD, Gina Dimitropoulos, PhD

Multi-family therapy (MFT) has been shown to be an effective therapy and is now recommended as a key treatment for adolescent AN alongside single family therapy (FT-AN) (NICE 2017). Empirical support for MFT comes from a recent multi-center RCT (Eisler et al 2017) and a number of smaller quantitative and qualitative studies. These have shown that MFT has specific benefits compared to FT-AN including improved outcomes, scalability and the potential to improve access for a greater number of patients and families. In qualitative studies families describe the strengths of MFT to include eliciting new perspectives and insights, enabling constructive behaviors, overcoming isolation and stigmatization, opening up family communication and instilling hope. A recent Maudsley Hospital and UCSD collaboration and parallel work in Alberta is showing that age-adapted MFT-AN can be used in the treatment of young adults (YAs) with promising initial findings. Implementing family interventions with YAs faces a key challenge: Prescribing a strong supportive parental role, which aims to both facilitate initial change in ED behaviors and ultimately foster independence, may at first feel developmentally inappropriate to families - parents fear that their wish to help will be seen by the YA as intrusive, while the YA may both want support but worries that their independent voice will not be heard. Feedback from families taking part in YA-MFT emphasize the role of MFT in helping to overcome these obstacles with parents encouraging each other to take greater risks in continuing to offer assistance to their offspring, while being respectful of the YAs independent voice, both of which are strengthened by being part of a group "chorus". This clinical skills workshop will focus on how to conduct ED-focused MFT with YAs. A brief overview of the empirical evidence for MFT (10 min) and key theoretical MFT principles (15 min) will be followed by a description of the specific modifications required to make the treatment applicable to families with YAs (15 min). The central part of the workshop will concentrate on the practical aspects of running MFT using experiential exercises of MFT group activities with active audience involvement (35 min), followed by a clinical discussion focused on implementation in participants' own service contexts (15 min).
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday
Time
2:15 PM - 3:45 PM
4/19/2018 2:15 PM
W 1.5 - Atypical Anorexia Nervosa in Adolescents - Not So Atypical!

Speakers: Neville Golden, MD, FAED, Debbie Katzman, MD, FRCPC, FAED, Andrea Garber, PhD, RD, Kara Fitzpatrick, PhD, FAED

Atypical anorexia nervosa (AAN) is a new diagnosis in the DSM-5 and is defined by symptoms of anorexia nervosa (AN) in the presence of "significant weight loss" in individuals who are within or above the normal weight range at presentation. On average, patients with AAN have lost more weight than those with AN and may also present with serious medical complications. Studies have reported that the number of patients with AAN requiring hospitalization for medical instability grew five-fold in six years and comprised one-third of the inpatient population. The care of these adolescents presents a number of challenges. First, the diagnosis is often missed by primary care providers, which may contribute to delayed referral for care. Second, the assessment of malnutrition may require additional evaluation since those relied upon for AN, provide little utility in AAN. Finally, there is no established definition of clinical remission or recovery in adolescents with AAN. Using case-based discussion by a multidisciplinary team, we will address these challenges. Specifically, we will use the best evidence in conjunction with clinical expertise and scientific principles to discuss growth (e.g., population reference and height velocity), weight suppression (e.g., metabolic rate and leptin), malnutrition and starvation, and recovery markers (e.g., resumption of menses and cognitive/behavioral markers) in formulating healthcare decisions. Together, the group will discuss controversies in diagnosis and varied approaches to clinical management. Active audience participation will be encouraged and we anticipate a very lively session.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday
Time
2:15 PM - 3:45 PM
4/19/2018 2:15 PM
W 1.6 - Regulation of Cues - A Novel Mechanistic Model for the Treatment of Obesity, Overeating and Binge Eating

Speakers: Dawn Eichen, PhD, and Kerri Boutelle, PhD

Current behavioral treatments of obesity result in clinical significant weight loss for approximately 50% of patients and binge eating treatments result in significant decreases in binge eating in 40-60% of patients. Targeting underlying mechanisms of overeating and binge eating could improve current treatment and maintenance outcomes. Schachter's externality theory of obesity suggests that individuals who overeat are less sensitive to internal hunger and satiety signals and more sensitive to external environmental cues to eat. We developed the Regulation of Cues (ROC) program which these two underlying mechanisms of overeating. ROC integrates appetite awareness training to target satiety responsiveness and cue exposure treatment to target food cue responsiveness and utilizes in vivo training with food. We have utilized this treatment with success with overweight adults who binge eat and and overweight children and their parent. This workshop will a) outline the key components of the ROC program; b) present findings from published and current studies that utilize ROC; c) demonstrate how to implement ROC using case examples, role-plays and audience participation; d) discuss common challenges with the implementation of ROC. Upon completion, workshop participants will appreciate the rationale for the ROC program, learn about the data supporting ROC, and develop the basic knowledge and skills to deliver the ROC program in clinical settings. Workshop attendees will partake in an appetite awareness training exercise and a cue exposure treatment exercise to gain a first-hand experience of what the ROC treatment entails. Accordingly, the majority of the workshop will be spent in experiential learning of the treatment components and preparing attendees to be equipped to deliver the treatment in clinical practice.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday
Time
2:15 PM - 3:45 PM
4/19/2018 2:15 PM
W 1.7 - Exploring the Efficacy of Dietitians Using Family Based Treatment Practices

Speakers: Russell Marx, MD, Anna Oliver, BSc, BPhEd, PGDipDiet, RD, Joanna Wiese, PhD, Bryan Lian, MS, RDN, Hillary Coons, PhD, Sarah Forsberg, PsyD

Eating disorder clinicians are encouraged to employ evidence-based practice (EBP). EBP is established from research on efficacy and effectiveness of interventions that evolve from evidence-based treatments (EBT), like Family Based Treatment (FBT). The distinction between EBT and EBP has implications for the use of treatment manuals outside of research settings. FBT is treatment of choice for anorexia nervosa in children and adolescents, yet dissemination of FBT is hampered by many barriers. One barrier is that FBT requires engagement in tasks outside of the usual scope of practice for therapists. Dietitians experienced in eating disorder treatment and who have studied FBT are a potential untapped resource for expanding delivery of EBP based on FBT. The workshop, moderated by a psychiatrist, includes presenters from dietetics and mental health discussing the pros and cons of involving dietitians in EBP based on FBT. Discussion will focus on ways dietitians can enhance FBT: collaborative use of dietitians as consultants for parents, therapists, and the multidisciplinary team; dietitians leading the refeeding aspect of treatment in conjunction with a therapist who focuses on family dynamics and developmental and emotional issues; and dietitians using modified versions of FBT to treat eating disorders. Additionally, panelists will address whether dietitians have the training to manage escalating crises of emotion and interpersonal conflict that can occur. UK's national eating disorder team training on anorexia-nervosa-focused family therapy (FT-AN) and bulimia nervosa- focused family therapy (FT-BN) will also be presented, with particular focus on the implications for dietetic practice. This workshop is intended for dietitians, mental health providers, and physicians. Guidelines for dietitians using FBT will be discussed and demonstrated with case studies. Lesson Plan: Introduction 5 min.; Content 40 min.; Small Group Discussion 15 min.; General Discussion 30 min.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday
Time
2:15 PM - 3:45 PM
4/19/2018 2:15 PM
P1.1: Treatment of Eating Disorders I (Child and Adolescent)
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday
Time
2:15 PM - 3:45 PM
4/19/2018 2:15 PM
P1.2: Body Image
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday
Time
2:15 PM - 3:45 PM
4/19/2018 2:15 PM
P1.3: BED and Obesity
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday
Time
2:15 PM - 3:45 PM
4/19/2018 2:15 PM
P1.4: Diagnosis, Classification and Measurement
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday
Time
2:15 PM - 3:45 PM
4/19/2018 2:15 PM
P1.5: Comorbidity
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday
Time
2:15 PM - 3:34 PM
4/19/2018 2:15 PM
SP 1.1 - From Research to Practice: Evaluating and Eliminating Disparities in Disordered Eating Among LGBT and Gender Variant Youth

Speakers: Natasha Schvey, PhD, Anne Claire Grammar, BA, Bryn Austin, ScD, Jerel Calzo, PhD, Allegra Gordon, MPH, ScD, Zachary McClain, MD, Rebecka Peebles, MD

LGBT and gender variant youth are at increased risk for eating disorders, maladaptive weight and shape control behaviors, body dissatisfaction, and impaired psychosocial functioning compared to cisgender, heterosexual youth. Importantly, there are many sociocultural and psychological factors unique to LGBT and gender variant youth that may exacerbate their vulnerability and risk. For example, weight and shape control behaviors may be used to disrupt pubertal development (e.g., losing weight to avoid the onset of menstruation and breast development; gaining weight to alter the appearance of primary and secondary sex characteristics) and prolonged abstention from eating and drinking may be employed to avoid using the restroom during the school day. Moreover, LGBT and gender variant youth are disproportionately affected by bullying, rejection, social stress, and depression and anxiety, all of which may contribute to the onset and maintenance of disordered eating behaviors. Considering the prevalence and deleterious effects of adolescent disordered eating, it is imperative to identify subgroups of youth that are at elevated risk, understand the specific factors that contribute to their vulnerability, and provide appropriate care. The goal of the proposed panel, therefore, is to elucidate the risk factors and mechanisms for eating pathology among LGBT and gender variant youth and offer perspectives on developing and providing culturally competent care. We propose to discuss the following: 1) risk factors for, and sociocultural determinants of, body dissatisfaction and eating disturbances among LGBT and gender variant youth; 2) considerations for designing culturally sensitive interventions; and 3) best practices for assessing and treating LGBT and gender variant youth in clinical care.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday
Time
2:15 PM - 3:45 PM
4/19/2018 2:15 PM
SP 1.2 - To Meal Plan or not to Meal Plan: Using Science and Expert Practice in Meal Planning

Speakers: Julia Cassidy, MS, RDN, CEDRDS, Melanie Jacob, RDN, Hilmar Wagner, MPH, RD, CD, Jillian Lampert, PhD, MPH, RD, Stephanie Brooks, MS, RD, CEDRD

The language of nutrition therapy has evolved from the exclusive use of exchange based meals plans to a variety of nutrition support provided across the spectrum of eating disorder diagnosis, ages of patients and stages of treatment. This panel will describe the strengths, limitations and contraindications of many types of nutrition support including: exchange lists, plate model, Herrin's RO3's (rule of threes), sample meal plans, calorie counting, family based nutrition model and mindful or intuitive eating. Nutrition therapy language should match the skill and knowledge of the patients/care givers and flex during phases of treatment to support patients in their recovery. Nutrition therapy interventions should also be informed by on-going results of research into the neurobiology of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder, particularly as it relates to reward processing and reaction to food related stimulus across ill and well states. Ideally, the goal is normalized eating, however, given emerging research, those recovering from anorexia nervosa may require more structured nutrition support until later into recovery when they can explore internally-directed eating. Those recovering from bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder may need particular structure in response to cue modulation and food reward sensitivity early on in recovery. This session will weave together science, expert practice and individual level clinical interventions into a useful, applicable toolkit of nutrition rehabilitation techniques across the range of eating disorder diagnosis, for use by a broad swath of practitioners.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 1 - Thursday
Time
2:15 PM - 3:45 PM
4/19/2018 2:15 PM

Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Thursday

 
W 2.1 - The Influence of Persuasion and Coercion in the Treatment of Eating Disorders

Speakers: Wayne Bowers, Ph. D, ABPP, FAED, and Taylor Ford, MSW

Power is a fact of daily life, just as various forms of coercion are a (controversial) companion in the treatment of individuals with eating disorders. This program will look at persuasion and coercion, and how a compassionate ethical approach is important to limit the influence of coercion when caring for individuals with an eating disorder. Various forms of persuasion and coercion will be discussed including civil commitment, involuntary treatment and the ethics of civil commitment. Ethical aspects of involuntary treatment will be discussed including the clinician's obligation to act in the patient's best interests. While the individual's right to self-determination is acknowledged, a duty to protect requires a clinician to proceed with treatment even if this is against the patient's wishes. One potential approach to ethical treatment for individuals with an eating disorder is for explicit disclosure of professionals' personal values and for professionals to make the rationale and steps involved in their decision making transparent to patients. Ethics of coercion suggests good clinical practice adheres to the parameters of respecting personal autonomy, providing the least restrictive interventions for a given clinical circumstance and using treatments that have been empirically demonstrated to be effective.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Thursday
Time
4:15 PM - 5:45 PM
4/19/2018 4:15 PM
W 2.2 - Moving from Science Influencing Practice to Engaging in Scientific Practice: How to Make Discoveries in the Clinic and Get Them Published

Speakers: Kyle De Young, PhD, Drew Anderson, PhD, FAED

Bridging the research-practice gap is critical to improve the care of individuals with eating disorders. Many barriers stand in the way of this goal, not the least of which is the perception of researchers and clinicians being different groups of people. The implicit suggestion that researchers generate knowledge that then must be absorbed and enacted by clinicians puts clinicians in a passive role and leads researchers to feel disconnected and powerless. The purpose of this workshop is to describe and emphasize the active role individuals who primarily engage in clinical practice can play in generating scientific knowledge and the role individuals who primarily engage in research can play in collaborating with those who practice in their communities. After an overview of the diversity of research designs useful for making new discoveries, contextualizing single-case research designs as a set of valid options particularly suitable for smaller-scale settings, the basics of creating a data collection protocol, informed consent and institutional review boards, and collaborating with colleagues in research positions will be discussed (20min). A brainstorming session for individualized opportunities and difficulties will follow, providing attendees with constructive feedback and additional ideas (20min). Next, specific examples of clinical research that can be accomplished in practice settings and with research collaboration will be provided (20min). Finally, participants will choose a research question, share their question with a group of peers, and collectively discuss options for testing their ideas using research strategies that increase the likelihood of drawing valid inferences, with the presenters available to provide feedback (30min). Attendees will also be encouraged to exchange contact information to build a network of scientific practitioners interested in making discoveries by leveraging the access and external validity of everyday practice.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Thursday
Time
4:15 PM - 5:45 PM
4/19/2018 4:15 PM
W 2.3 - Eating Disorders in Bariatric Surgery Populations: Assessment, Treatment and Special Considerations

Speakers: Leslie Heinberg, PhD, FAED, James Mitchell, MD, FAED, Eva Conceição, PhD

Bariatric surgery patients are of increasing interest to eating disorder (ED) clinicians. A subset require pre-surgical treatment of ED patterns (e.g., binge eating disorder). Similarly, aftercare is needed for patients who have developed ED behaviors (e.g., graze eating) or other complications (e.g., body image disturbance). To stimulate involvement and understand the background, a 10 minute brainstorming will review the main challenges in this population. Discussion will be stimulated by prompts including: difficulties experienced; differences in presentation; adequacy of available assessment and intervention tools; and the role of surgery for the onset of ED-like behaviors. 1. Overview and Assessment: An overview detailing the types of bariatric surgery, their outcomes and complications, and impact on ED will be followed by review of the Bariatric Surgery Version of the Eating Disorders Examination (EDE-BSV), (20 minutes), Dr. Mitchell; 2. Treatment Options for Pre-operative ED: will focus on Binge, Night and Graze Eating. Handouts from a validated treatment manual for pre-operative ED will be included. Materials will be reviewed with multiple case examples and audience discussion. (20 minutes), Dr. Heinberg; 3. Treatment Options for Post-operative ED: Therapeutic strategies that can be utilized for the post-surgical ED will be reviewed. Handouts from a comprehensive, experimentally utilized treatment manual will be distributed. The manual will be briefly reviewed with multiple case examples and audience discussion. (20 minutes), Dr. Conceição; 4. Overview and Assessment of Other Problematic Outcomes: Case examples presented by the audience will be discussed with supporting literature and audience discussion. Role play strategy will be used to illustrate how the presented strategies are employed in real cases. Special attention will be paid to comorbid body image disturbance and alcohol use disorders. (20 minutes), Panel.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Thursday
Time
4:15 PM - 5:45 PM
4/19/2018 4:15 PM
W 2.4 - Treating Comorbid Suicidality and Non-suicidal Self-injury among Multi-problem Adolescents with Eating Disorders: A DBT Approach

Speakers: Michelle Lupkin, PhD, Lucene Wisniewski, PhD FAED

Rates of mortality for ED patients are among the highest of all psychiatric disorders, with suicide contributing significantly to these statistics. In adolescents with ED, lifetime prevalence of SI ranges from 31-52% and 8-15% for suicide attempts (SA), with risk for SA increasing significantly when adolescents present with other comorbid psychopathology (Crow et al., 2014). Additionally, 27% of adolescents with ED have engaged in NSSI (Cucchi, et al., 2016). Despite these alarming statistics, most evidenced-based treatment models do not include a framework for addressing these behaviors directly. Further, given the added risk in treating these patients in an outpatient setting, many therapists and facilities will not treat or are fearful of treating adolescents presenting with ED and comorbid SI and NSSI. Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), a therapy originally designed for chronically suicidal, difficult-to-treat patients, provides a clear and systematic approach for addressing the behavior of patients with multiple comorbidities. DBT has been adapted to treat multiproblem adolescents and places a strong emphasis on including the family in both individual and group modalities of treatment. Given the literature on the importance of family in the treatment of adolescents with ED combined with the effectiveness of DBT in eliminating SI and NSSI in adolescents, DBT may be an effective approach for treating adolescents presenting with the difficult combination of ED, comorbid psychopathology, and SI or NSSI. Using case presentations, role play, and discussions, participants will learn how to use the DBT target hierarchy to structure individual sessions in the treatment of adolescents with complex ED. Specifically, participants will learn how to address SI and NSSI in the context of ED symptoms and other comorbidities. It is hoped that in learning these treatment strategies participants will feel more confident in their ability to treat adolescents with complex ED.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Thursday
Time
4:15 PM - 5:45 PM
4/19/2018 4:15 PM
W 2.5 - Disordered Eating and Body Image in Middle-aged and Older Women: Research- and Evidence- based Approaches to Treatment

Speakers: Niva Piran, PhD, FAED, Margo Maine, PhD FAED, Mary Tantillo, PhD FAED

Across the globe, increasing numbers of middle aged and older women, a significant segment of the population, are reporting high rates of negative body image and disordered eating. Although frequently associated with co-morbid disorders, their plights, like their bodies, are often 'unseen.' The workshop aims to equip participants with research and evidence-based approaches to understanding and working on body image issues with middle aged and older women. Part I (20 min.) will address the particular challenges faced by older women, including: physical experiences (e.g., unaddressed histories of physical trauma, aging), social expectations (e.g., other-oriented care, superwoman performance), and social disempowerment (e.g., related to ageism, sexism, racism), as informed by studies with older women and the research-based Developmental Theory of Embodiment. Participants will be invited to reflect on their own body journeys through an experiential exercise, followed by a group discussion of the implications to practice of Part I (20 min.). Part II of the workshop will focus, first, on applying several evidence-based practices in responding to the unique clinical needs of older women (20 min.). Relational-Cultural Therapy (R-CT) is an effective approach to working with women that conceptualizes mental distress (e.g., disordered eating patterns) as an expression of disconnection from self and others in responses to adverse relational and cultural contexts. This approach can be particularly attuned to the experiences of older women in focusing on shifting long-held patterns of relational disconnections, self-disavowal, and disempowerment. Further, supplementary effective techniques used in trauma-informed therapy, such as the sensorimotor approach and psycho-education, can target long held self-body disconnection. Part II will conclude with group discussions of case studies (20 min.), and end with participants' reflections (10 min.).
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Thursday
Time
4:15 PM - 5:45 PM
4/19/2018 4:15 PM
W 2.6 - The Challenge of Working Inter-culturally: Are We Sufficiently Considering Race, Culture and Ethnicity in the Treatment of Adolescent Eating Disorders? A Discussion from Three Continents

Speakers: Elizabeth Dodge, MSc, CQSW, Gina Dimitropoulos, PhD, MSW, RSW, Martin Pradel, BSW, McFT

In recent years, attention has been paid to cross cultural aspects of eating disorders and their increased incidence world-wide. However, there has been less focus on families from minority ethnic groups or consideration of how the process of immigration may impact on engagement, treatment and maintaining factors for the eating disorder. In many countries e.g. the US, Canada, Australia, and the UK a family intervention focused on the eating disorder is the recommended first line of treatment for adolescents. These are countries with significant multicultural communities including first nations/indigenous people, newly arrived immigrants and those who have been settled over several generations. The recognition and diagnosis of eating disorders in young people from these communities may be affected by stereotypical beliefs held by professionals and unusual presentations impacting on early access to appropriate services. Initial engagement and development of a good therapeutic alliance can be influenced by families' feelings of stigma, concerns regarding confidentiality, the demands of family resettlement, and beliefs about mental illness. Racism, a history of trauma and loss, acculturation, poverty, religious and cultural beliefs and practices and family relationship to food and beliefs about self-starvation may all impact on treatment as well as on the development and trajectory of the eating disorder. Assessment and engagement of families by clinical teams requires an understanding and sensitivity regarding these issues whilst holding in mind evidence based treatment with a focus on early weight restoration. In addition, clinicians should be able to reflect on their own cultural background and use of self in therapy. Each presenter will outline some of their experience from Australia, Canada and the UK. The workshop will include experiential exercises reflecting on meaning of illness behaviors, and provide opportunity for participants to share their experience.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Thursday
Time
4:15 PM - 5:45 PM
4/19/2018 4:15 PM
W 2.7 - Incorporating Technology in Assessment and Treatment of Eating Disorders in Clinical Practice

Speakers: Shiri Sadeh-Sharvit, PhD, Ellen Fitzsimmons-Craft, PhD, Denise Wilfley, PhD, C. Barr Taylor, MD

Technology-enhanced services for eating disorders (EDs) are becoming increasingly available and individuals with EDs presenting for treatment may expect or want to be able to use their smartphones, computers, and/or wearable devices to monitor their symptoms or work on difficulties between sessions. This workshop will provide important knowledge, skills and capabilities for ED professionals who are interested in incorporating telepsychology and digital tools in their clinical practice. We will first present guidelines to determine in which cases technology could benefit clients, and how to assess the client's and the provider's readiness for introducing technology. The empirical support for said programs will be evaluated as well (20 minutes). We will then demonstrate how currently available digital resources can aid clients with EDs, using case reports and role-plays: clinician-led and patient-led assessment of ED symptoms and monitoring of progress; telepsychology and telemedicine to provide remote care when warranted via text and email messages as well as web-conferencing platforms; online support or treatment groups for patients; opportunities for remote training and consultation; analysis of the individual's use of social media and its impact on ED symptoms; and the use of guided self-help, coached programs to reduce target symptoms and improve resilience (40 minutes). The workshop will also describe safety, privacy, ethical and billing considerations in the use of technology with individuals with EDs (10 minutes). Finally, we will provide participants with tools to develop a learning plan to identify, assess, and practice technology-based resources that could complement their clinical practice, and open the discussion to questions from the audience (20 minutes).
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Thursday
Time
4:15 PM - 5:45 PM
4/19/2018 4:15 PM
P2.1: Risk Factors for Eating Disorders
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Thursday
Time
4:15 PM - 5:45 PM
4/19/2018 4:15 PM
P2.2: Treatment of Eating Disorders II (Adult)
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Thursday
Time
4:15 PM - 5:45 PM
4/19/2018 4:15 PM
P2.3: Prevention and Innovative Uses of Technology
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Thursday
Time
4:15 PM - 5:45 PM
4/19/2018 4:15 PM
P2.4: Biology and Medical Complications
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Thursday
Time
4:15 PM - 4:45 PM
4/19/2018 4:15 PM
P2.5: ARFID
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Thursday
Time
4:15 PM - 5:45 PM
4/19/2018 4:15 PM
SP2.1 - How to Choose Your Yellow Brick Road: Exploring Diverse Career Paths and Using Personal Values to Inform Career Trajectories

Speakers: Kathryn Coniglio, BA, Annie Haynos, PhD, Helen Murray, BA, Linsey Utzinger, PsyD, Giovanni Castellini, MD, PhD, Daniel Le Grange, PhD, FAED, Renee Rienecke, PhD, FAED, Marian Tanofsky-Kraff, PhD, FAED, Heather Thompson-Brenner, PhD, FAED

Given the multitude of paths available within the field of eating disorders, many individuals early in their career have difficulty deciding which type of career will most ideally suit them, and what steps are necessary to pursue their desired career. This workshop will allow students, trainees, and new investigators in the eating disorders field the opportunity to: 1) learn from leaders in the field about different career options; 2) think critically about what trajectory best corresponds with their interests, strengths, and values; and 3) determine what steps are necessary to pursue various career paths. Indeed, the idea for the workshop came out of a request from Student and New Investigator SIG members to learn more about different career paths to consider relevant advantages and disadvantages of various career directions. Panelists represent a diverse range of career paths (e.g., clinical, research in arts and sciences, research in a medical school), career development stages (i.e., both early career and well-established), and career and training location (i.e., panelists have trained and worked both within the United States and internationally). Panelists will first give a brief 10-minute introduction of their position and career path, including advantages and disadvantages of the position, and the ways in which their job corresponds with their personal strengths and values. Attendees will then participate in a panelist-facilitated, small group self-reflection activity designed to use their interests, strengths, and work and life values to guide decisions about their career path. The workshop will conclude with a question and answer session with panelists in a larger group format about the rewards and challenges of specific careers, and the steps required to pursue such career paths.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 2 - Thursday
Time
4:15 PM - 5:45 PM
4/19/2018 4:15 PM

Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Friday

 
W 3.1 - Targeting Emotion in Eating Disorders Treatment: The Use of Behaviorally-Based Psychotherapy Techniques to Facilitate Emotion Regulation

Speakers: Carol Peterson, PhD FAED, Stephen Wonderlich, PhD FAED, Lucene Wisniewski, PhD FAED, Emily Pisetsky, PhD

Emotions play a critical role in the development and maintenance of eating disorder behaviors. However, emotion-focused interventions vary widely across treatments. This workshop will focus on targeting emotion in eating disorders using behaviorally-based treatments that emphasize emotion regulation. Specifically, this workshop will provide an empirical approach to understanding the importance of identifying "momentary" emotions that precipitate eating disorder behaviors along with empirically supported behavioral approaches that can be used to improve emotion regulation. Dr. Wonderlich will initially provide a conceptual overview with empirical support for the role of emotions in eating disorders (10 minutes). Dr. Wisniewski will then discuss how Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) techniques can be used to address emotions in the context of eating disorder treatment, including rationale and case descriptions (15 minutes). Dr. Peterson will then present Integrative Cognitive-Affective Therapy (ICAT) and describe how this treatment focuses on the functions of emotions in the treatment of eating disorders, including the theoretical model informing ICAT and clinical examples (15 minutes). The final portion of the workshop (50 minutes) will be led by Dr. Pisetsky (along with Drs. Wonderlich, Wisniewski, and Peterson serving as panelists), who will present several case examples and facilitate an interactive discussion with workshop attendees to illustrate the specific application of these techniques to address emotions and facilitate emotion regulation in the context of eating disorders treatment.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Friday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/20/2018 11:15 AM
W 3.2 - Project ECHO® Eating Disorders: Connecting Primary Care, College Health, and Behavioral Health Providers to Eliminate Eating Disorders

Speakers: Mary Tantillo, PhD PMHCNS-BC FAED, Richard Kreipe, MD, FAAP, FSAHM, FAED, Taylor Starr, DO, MPH, FAAP

This workshop will immerse participants in the Project ECHO® Eating Disorders Clinic (PE-EDC), an innovative telementoring model designed to enable local health care professionals to provide best-practice care for patients with eating disorders in their community. PE-EDC, hosted by the Western New York Comprehensive Care Center for Eating Disorders (WNYCCCED) at the University of Rochester Medical Center, is the first-and currently only-such Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes Project. This model can reduce health care disparities, variations in health care delivery, and acute care costs due to earlier recognition of illness and quicker referral and intervention. PE-EDC leverages its "hub and spoke knowledge-sharing networks" to formally connect an expert Eating Disorder team of specialists at an academic central "hub" with front-line primary care, college health, and behavioral health care providers in local community "spokes". During the workshop, attendees will participate as a learning community in an abbreviated, 30 minute mock ECHO session (usually streamed via Zoomÿ videoconferencing). Workshop presenters will assume the roles of members of the expert team engaging in a review of a de-identified case, providing mentoring, and promoting inter-professional learning regarding effective team functioning. Before and after the mock PE-EDC, 30-minutes of didactic instruction will demonstrate how each session "moves knowledge, not people" as often occurs with highly centralized services in large urban centers. By permitting patients and families to be treated in their communities, this model reduces the need for extensive travel and anxiety-provoking transitions, while facilitating evidence-based comprehensive, continuous, and integrated medical and behavioral care. The workshop include will conclude with discussion of steps required to replicate PE-EDC, preliminary results from PE-EDC's program evaluation, and a question and answer period (30 minutes).
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Friday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/20/2018 11:15 AM
W 3.3 - Recovering Together: Approaching Eating Disorder Recovery from Multiple Perspectives

Speakers: Beth McGilley, PhD, FAED, CEDS, Andrea Lamarre, PhD (ABD), MSc., BAHons, Judy Krasna, BA

For years, clinicians, researchers, people with lived experience and caregivers have shared in the frustration of lacking a consensus definition for eating disorder recovery. Accordingly, we lack a mutual understanding of what eating disorder recovery entails, how to best measure it for clinical and research purposes, and how to describe it to people with eating disorders and their supporters (McGilley, 2010). Existing studies reveal differences in understandings of recovery amongst clinicians and people with eating disorders (e.g., Noordenbos, 2011). Further, clinicians and researchers differ in their perspectives on what constitutes recovery, whether full recovery is possible, and what outcome criteria should be employed. There is a persistent orientation to recovery as "more than" symptom remission (e.g. Bardone-Cone et al., 2010), but what the "more than" constitutes remains unclear. People in recovery may thus be unsure what it means, and orient to the concept differently based on what they have seen and heard about recovery (Holmes, 2016). The absence of definitional clarity leads some to feel recovery is unattainable (LaMarre & Rice, 2015; LaMarre & Rice, 2017; Malson et al., 2011). Finally, little work has been conducted on supporters' characterization of recovery, representing a major gap in our understanding of this concept. In this workshop, we explore what recovery means from the perspective of clinicians, researchers, people with lived experience, and supporters. Attendees will actively share in a process of establishing priorities for better recovery research. This interactive format will allow for a rich, nuanced discussion of what constitutes recovery, how all relevant stakeholders can contribute to an empirically derived consensus definition, and the steps needed to then test, translate and disseminate these findings in the clinical and lay literature.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Friday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/20/2018 11:15 AM
W 3.4 - Clinical Practice and Research Opportunities. How is it to be an Eating Disorders Professional in Your Country?

Speakers: Sebastian Soneira, MD, Psyhiatrist, Ashish Kumar, MD, Child Psychiatrist

The working realities of eating disorders professionals are very diverse around the world. In spite of the process of globalization that prevails in scientific activities today, the lack of knowledge of the local realities of each country by colleagues from other regions of the world contributes to diminishing the possibilities of integration and collaboration among specialists.In order to continue the task of achieving reciprocal integration and knowledge between Eating Disorders professionals and in harmony with the spirit of ICED 2018, in the present workshop the Partnership, Chapter and Affiliate Committee will invite colleagues from different parts of the world to comment on their work situations both in the areas of clinical care and research/ education.Each speaker will answer a series of guiding questions about his local reality and summarize the pros and cons of the reality of his country. Following each presentation there will be audience discussion including identification of similarities and differences in reality in different parts of the world. The final part of the workshop will be devoted to a discussion with the audience on how to use the positive aspects of each local reality to increase international collaboration among colleagues.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Friday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/20/2018 11:15 AM
W 3.5 - Parent-Based Prevention for Parents with Eating Disorders

Speakers: Shiri Sadeh-Sharvit, PhD, Cristin Runfola, PhD, Lilya Osipov, PhD, James Lock, MD, PhD

Parents with eating disorders share a common set of concerns and challenges in their parenting. While many families nowadays feel bombarded with conflicting messages about their children's eating and weight, a personal history of or a present eating disorder in a parent may impede parents' comfort, confidence, knowledge, and available skills in supporting the development of healthful eating habits in their children. Health care professionals working with parents and their partners are often unsure how best to talk with them about the cognitions and behaviors related to parental eating, weight and shape concerns. Providers may also find it challenging to address effectively possible associations between the parental eating disorder, parenting practices, and the family's transactions around body image, food, and wellness. To increase provider competence in navigating these challenges, information presented in this workshop will help participants learn about the Parent-Based Prevention, a manualized, 12-session program designed to help parents with eating disorders and their partners to reduce risk of eating disorders in offspring. The workshop will a) describe theoretical considerations and empirical findings underlying this intervention and b) outline strategies and best practices that have led to better outcomes for these families. The workshop will begin by outlining the mechanisms impacting parents and how they are addressed in the intervention (30 minutes). Two case-studies will be used to illustrate and guide interactive discussion using active-learner techniques (e.g., role plays). The case-studies will aim to help providers practice evaluating whether, when, and to what extent parental eating disorder history affects parents' interactions with their children, and develop strategies to support parents in addressing identified challenges (45 minutes). In the last 15 minutes, workshop participants will have the opportunity to present cases for consultation.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Friday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/20/2018 11:15 AM
W 3.6 - When Family Therapy May Not Cut It Alone - Assessment, Formulation and Treatment Options for Young People with Comorbid Eating Disorders and Self-harm

Speakers: Keren Smith, DClinPsy, Mima Simic, MRCPsych, Katrina Hunt, DClinPsy,Rhian Parham, DClinPsy, Lindsay Smith, DClinPsy, Elizabeth Godard, DClinPSY, Julian Baudinet, DClinPsy

Eating disorder focused family therapy (FT-ED) has been shown to be efficacious with most adolescents with eating disorders (NICE 2017). However a substantial number of young people do not achieve full recovery following FT-ED (Lock, 2015). Self-harm is a common comorbid clinical presentation of young people with an eating disorder (Koutek, Kocourkova & Dudova, 2016). Within clinical settings, this can be a significant factor moderating the efficacy of FT-ED and additional treatment options are needed for young people who present with comorbid eating disorders and self-harm. This clinical skills workshop will focus on relevant factors to consider in the assessment, formulation and treatment of young people presenting with both eating disorder and self-harm symptomatology. There will be an emphasis on the way eating disorder symptoms and self-harm interact and how together they can function to prevent young people and families from progressing towards recovery. The evidence base to date regarding this comorbid presentation will be reviewed (10 mins) followed by an experiential group task relating to assessment and formulation of young people based on clinical presentations seen at the Maudsley Hospital (30 mins). A brief presentation will explore the assessment of under-controlled or over-controlled emotion regulation and its role in case formulation to determine the treatment pathway that may include either Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) or Radically Open DBT (RO-DBT) as a treatment option (30 mins). Participants will also be invited to discuss their own case examples and clinical dilemmas regarding assessment, formulation and treatment of young people with comorbid eating disorders and self-harm (20 mins).

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Friday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/20/2018 11:15 AM
W 3.7 - Adults Only: Parent-Focused Treatment for Restrictive Eating Disorders in Youth

Speakers: Katharine L. Loeb, PhD, FAED, Daniel Le Grange, PhD, FAED, Martin Pradel, MClinFT

Traditionally, Family-Based Treatment (FBT) is delivered as a conjoint model whereby the whole family is seen together in session. This allows the therapist to directly observe and intervene in family interactions, although it also raises challenges. The content of sessions may not be appropriate for all family members, aspects of illness behaviors may interfere with the therapeutic process, and there is prior evidence that families with high expressed emotion may fare better in a separated form of FBT. Recently, the Royal Children's Hospital in Melbourne conducted a randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing FBT with a variant model, Parent Focused Treatment (PFT). In PFT, the therapist meets with only the parents, while a nurse attends to monitoring the adolescent's weight, mental and medical status, and provides brief (~10-min) supportive counseling. Results of this RCT showed that remission rates were higher in the PFT group (43.1% v 21.8%) at the end of treatment. This workshop, presented by an international panel of PFT researchers and practitioners, will (a) elucidate the background of and rationale for a separated format of family treatment leading to the design of PFT (5 min); (b) highlight the key differences between FBT and PFT and discuss whether moderator data guide the selection of one format or the other for particular families (5 min); (c) interpret the results of the RCT against the backdrop of prior FBT-related research (5 min); (d) illustrate PFT in practice through case examples and group-based role-plays with workshop participants (45 min); and (e) review challenges (clinical and service-based) in real-world implementation of the PFT model. These themes will be generated interactively from the audience based on the role-play experience, and modeled by unscripted dialogue between a PFT clinician and supervisor reflecting on invited case material from participants (20 min). The workshop will conclude with a question-and-answer segment (10 min).

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Friday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/20/2018 11:15 AM
P3.1: Gender, Ethnicity, and Culture
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Friday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/20/2018 11:15 AM
P3.2: Treatment of Eating Disorders II (Adult) and Other
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Friday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/20/2018 11:15 AM
P3.3: BED and Obesity
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Friday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/20/2018 11:15 AM
P3.4: Comorbidity
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Friday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/20/2018 11:15 AM
P3.5: Children and Adolescents and Other
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Friday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/20/2018 11:15 AM
SP3.1 - Incorporating Parents as Members of the Team in the Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Eating Disorders

Speakers: Roxanne Rockwell, PhD, Stephanie Jacobs, PhD, Rebecka Peebles, MD, Erin Reeves, MS, RD, JD Ouellette, MS, Jocelyn Lebow, PhD, Mindy Soloman, PhD

The Family Based Treatment (FBT) and Child and Adolescent Special Interest Groups' panel will discuss how incorporating parents as members of the treatment team is integral to effective treatment in young people with eating disorders. The fundamental assumption is that the patient has the best chance at recovery through the synthesis of parental and professional expertise in a variety of treatment modalities (e.g. Family Based Treatment, Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, Emotion-Focused Family Treatment, etc.). This panel will focus on how to incorporate parents as members of the team while acknowledging and respecting each of the multidisciplinary team members' areas of expertise (e.g. adolescent medicine physician, therapist, dietitian, parent/caregiver, etc.). Presenters will include the diverse perspectives of providers from a range of orientations and parents. The panel will begin with a brief overview of fundamental concepts that provide the foundation for incorporating parents/caregivers in collaborative communication alongside the treatment team. Provider and parent perspectives will be discussed in the context of what has been effective and ineffective in actual clinical experience. Threats to parental self-efficacy, and common misconceptions about treatment teams that include parents and caregivers will be addressed. Role plays and other interactive modalities will be used to illustrate the concepts to foster discussion with the audience.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Friday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/20/2018 11:15 AM
SP3.2 - Exploring Recovery through a Health at Every Size(R) and Fat Acceptance Lens: What We Can Learn from Recovered Professionals Who Identify as HAES(R)-Oriented and Fat Positive

Speakers: Rachel Millner, PsyD, CEDS1, Erin Harrop, MSW, CPP2, Aaron Flores, RDN3, Carmen Cool, MA, LPC4, Mikalina Kirkpatrick, BS

Diet culture, fat phobia, and weight bias negatively impact society at large, as well as those trying to recover from eating disorders (EDs). Specifically, weight bias has been linked with numerous social and economic consequences, in addition to deleterious health and psychological impacts, including disordered eating. Recovering ED clients frequently cite that cultural messages about eating, "health," and weight make recovery even more difficult. The Health at Every Size(HAES(R)) and fat acceptance movements provide an alternative paradigm to dominant cultural messages about food, weight, and health. HAES(R) and fat acceptance offer a different perspective than diet culture and question the value placed on thinness for achieving wellbeing. Additionally, these perspectives offer tools that increase resilience and help to achieve and maintain full recovery. As more professionals in the ED field speak openly about their own recovery processes, it is important to examine what helped and hindered those processes. This panel discussion is co-sponsored by the HAES(R) and Recovery Special Interest Groups and focuses on the role of HAES(R) and fat acceptance in the recovery process. We will explore how a HAES(R)-based approach can be helpful personally and professionally, and discuss the importance of having a HAES(R) and fat acceptance community. We will look at the impact of internalized weight stigma, the path to body-acceptance, and explore why it is important for ED professionals to explicitly identify as HAES(R)-oriented and fat positive. We will also discuss the limits of these perspectives, and discuss how these paradigms could become more intersectional in their understanding of oppression and social justice. Additionally, we will discuss resources that were instrumental in panel member's recovery process and provide a HAES(R) and fat acceptance resource list for attendees. This panel will include time for each panel member to speak as well as time for questions and discussion.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 3 - Friday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/20/2018 11:15 AM

Educational Session Selection: Session 4 - Friday

 
W4.1 - Dialectical Behavior Therapy Guided Self-Help for Binge Eating Disorder

Speakers: Jacqueline C. Carter, DPhil, FAED, Debra L. Safer, MD, Therese E. Kenny, MSc, Christopher W. Singleton, BA (Hons)

Binge eating disorder (BED) was recently added to the Feeding and Eating Disorders section of the DSM-5 to describe individuals who experience recurrent binge eating in the absence of extreme compensatory behaviors and who suffer significant distress and impairment as a result. Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), based on the affect regulation model of binge eating, is an evidence-based treatment approach for BED that is not widely available. Self-help approaches to DBT may be an effective means of disseminating this treatment more widely due to access-to-care barriers such as rural environments, lack of trained therapists, and cost. In this interactive workshop, we will begin with an introduction to DBT for BED and a brief review of the treatment research on DBT for BED (10 minutes). We will then describe the new DBT guided self-help (GSH) program for BED that we have recently developed and tested in a randomized controlled trial. This approach is based on a new DBT self-help manual for BED (Safer, Adler & Masson, in press) and investigated the use of secure videoconferencing to administer GSH sessions in rural areas. Detailed case examples will be presented including segments from videotaped DBT-GSH sessions with BED participants. Role-plays and experiential exercises will be used to demonstrate key DBT-GSH strategies as well as challenges that we have encountered (60 minutes). Preliminary results of our trial evaluating this approach will be presented (10 minutes). We will leave 15 minutes at the workshop's conclusion for questions and discussion.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 4 - Friday
Time
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
4/20/2018 2:00 PM
W4.2 - Developing Research-Practice Integration of Trauma/PTSD Focused Treatments in an Eating Disorders Program

Speakers: Douglas Bunnell, PhD, FAED, CEDS1, Melissa Coffin, PsyD, CEDS1, Timothy Brewerton, MD, FAED, DFAACAP, HCEDS

There is evidence that PTSD and trauma reactions are critical perpetuating factors in ED. In a representative national sample, 90-100% of subjects with ED reported a history of trauma and a recent meta-analysis confirmed that child maltreatment is a significant risk factor. Clinicians are often ill-equipped to treat concurrent ED and PTSD and there are few reports of models for concurrent treatment in intensive ED treatment programs. This workshop will review the design and implementation of integrated trauma and ED treatment protocols in a large multi-site residential and partial hospital ED program. Having identified the need to shift from a sequential model that prioritized treatment of the ED prior to addressing trauma reactions, the new concurrent model required program wide training and development of consistent assessment methods and psychoeducational resources. Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) was identified as the best fit with the existing treatment protocols, which already target transdiagnostic factors such as emotional/experiential avoidance, core beliefs underlying the ED urges and behaviors, and cognitive distortions. The latter stage CPT modules on trust, intimacy and self-esteem also align with the program's focus on interpersonal capabilities as key components of recovery. The first 30 minutes of this workshop reviews the overlap of PTSD and ED and the basics of CPT. In the next 30 minutes, we will survey attendees on their comfort and familiarity with trauma-focused approaches then follow with a description of the challenges of introducing a highly manualized evidence based treatment into existing residential and partial hospital protocols. The final interactive section discusses specific case examples and reviews preliminary empirical data on changes in trauma reactivity and eating symptomatology before concluding with recommendations about training, supervision, and program evaluation of this model for concurrent treatment of PTSD and ED.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 4 - Friday
Time
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
4/20/2018 2:00 PM
W4.3 - When Diversity of Opinion Leads to Gridlock: Why the Eating Disorders World Struggles to Find a Common Voice

Speakers: Laura Collins Lyster-Mensh, MS, Carolyn Costin, MA, Med, LMFT, CEDS, FAED, Stephanie Bauer, PhD, Eric van Furth, PhD, Carolyn Black Becker, PhD, FAED

Eating disorders (EDs) exist in a prism of different disciplines, stakeholder perspectives, healthcare systems, and public perceptions. The Academy for Eating Disorders represents the largest international body to promote ED science and professionalism. AED members represent so many views and perspectives that it can be a struggle to form or maintain common positions. This situation is not unique to AED or to eating disorders, but this lack of consensus blocks outreach, collaboration, and engagement between otherwise allied organizations. Further, a lack of shared core understandings regarding ED etiology, treatment, and outcome also leads to silos of association and thought. For AED to show leadership, attract members, to achieve consensus, and speak with a shared voice we must improve communication. Factors contributing to lack of consensus include a desire to create a "big tent" aimed at welcoming all in the field, a history of distrust among stakeholder groups, as well as a desire to avoid conflict. Yet some consensus is needed so that AED can help eating disorder professionals and researchers gain credibility in their own professional environments for the purposes of policy and funding. A clear voice also is needed on the global stage as well to support individuals and their families in advocating for their own care. This panel will respectfully engage with one another and with the workshop participants to identify three core points of consensus as a start, and a demonstration of the opportunities. Open, civil, courageous dialogue will be facilitated and required.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 4 - Friday
Time
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
4/20/2018 2:00 PM
W4.4 - The Interplay of Chronic Health Conditions and Eating Disorders: Identification and Treatment Implications

Speakers: Deborah Glasofer, PhD, Karen Rosewater, MD, Laurel Mayer, MD, Matthew Shear, MD, Janet Schebendach, PhD/RD, Evelyn Attia, MD

Eating disorders and somatic complaints often go hand in hand, and present unique challenges for the clinician. Significant medical illnesses may have unique features that can contribute to the development of, mask the symptoms of, or otherwise complicate the treatment of both the medical condition and the eating disorder. A treatment team can help distinguish medical illness from eating disorder or in the absence of such clarity, identify reasonable targets for behavior and cognitive change in treatment alongside medical monitoring. In this workshop, a multidisciplinary panel will present illustrative case material. We will discuss the interaction of medical conditions including diabetes, celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome, food allergies, and gastroesophageal reflux disease with a range of feeding and eating disorders including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, ARFID, and rumination disorder. Identification of these conditions in adolescents and young adults, and the challenges in proper diagnosis, patient education and engagement in appropriately targeted treatment interventions, will be highlighted, with an emphasis on the ways in which our interventions may influence subsequent illness trajectory.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 4 - Friday
Time
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
4/20/2018 2:00 PM
W4.6 - 15 Years of the Australian and New Zealand Academy of Eating Disorders. Reflections on Successfully Mobilizing the Australian and New Zealand Eating Disorder Community to Bringing Eating Disorders into the Public Consciousness

Sloane Madden, MBBS (Hons), PhD, FAED, Phillipa Hay, PhD, FAED, Anthea Fursland, PhD, Chris Thornton, PhD

With no budget and a large tin of instant coffee The Australian and New Zealand Academy of Eating Disorders (ANZAED) held its first academic meeting in 2003 in the lecture theatre of a Teaching Hospital in Western Sydney to a handful of curious medical and allied health professionals. In August 2017 ANZAED returned to Sydney to hold its 15th Conference to an Audience of over 450 eating disorder professionals, advocates, politicians, carers and consumers to discuss the key theme of Building Connections. This workshop involving four past presidents of ANZAED with discuss key strategies that have allowed the organisation to develop into a financially secure organisation with over 320 members with key partnerships with national carer and consumer advocacy groups, roles on national and state-based advisory bodies directing government health policies and the development of Australia's own eating disorder journal, The Journal of Eating Disorders. The workshop will spend the first 20 minutes discussing the Australian and New Zealand eating disorder environment and successful interventions in the development of year round professional development, helping to shape positive health policy, increasing public awareness and reducing stigma for this under served group. The workshop will encourage audience members to bring their experiences of their local eating disorder organisations and reflect on successes and struggles in advocating for professionals, carers and consumers. The workshop will break into smaller groups to discuss common struggles, discuss innovative solutions for eating disorder education and advocacy and look for synergies between organisations to continue to place eating disorders at the centre of the health policy debate.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 4 - Friday
Time
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
4/20/2018 2:00 PM
W4.7 - Outpatient Medical Considerations in Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, and Binge Eating Disorder: Best Practices for the Measurable, the Unmeasurable, and All Points in Between

Speaker: Jennifer Gaudiani, MD, CEDS, FAED

Patients with eating disorders in the outpatient setting, of all genders, all ages, and all shapes and sizes, suffer from a wide variety of medical issues. Some occur directly due to their eating disorder, and some present as other unrelated, primary diagnoses that nonetheless are unified by the presence of a very strong mind-body connection. Many patients with eating disorders are viewed with bewilderment or suspicion by the primary care system, where lack of awareness of eating disorder medicine by providers is a barrier that is reinforced by the somatic, often unmeasurable nature of symptoms patients experience. However, excellent outpatient care of patients with eating disorders must include thoughtful, evidence-based, and non-assumptive diagnosis and treatment. In this case-based workshop, medical issues that occur in outpatients with eating disorders will be reviewed in a way that will allow attendees to become better advocates and clinicians for these patients. Furthermore, the better we focus on objective evidence of body suffering in those with eating disorders, the more convincingly we can persuade patients that they aren’t “fine,” and indeed deserve treatment and a respite from their eating disorder behaviors. The full spectrum of eating disorders will be covered in this workshop, forming a representative body of knowledge needed by outpatient practitioners. Cases will include patients with binge eating disorder, those with atypical anorexia nervosa who restrict and exercise just as much as others but remain in larger bodies, those with bulimia nervosa, athletes, as well as those with orthorexia. Topics include classic medical problems that must be well diagnosed, treated, and communicated, such as vital sign changes, gastroparesis, and relative energy deficiency in sport (RED-S). In addition, cases will include the less measurable but equally pressing subjects of intractable nausea and vomiting, postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, mast cell activation, irritable bowel syndrome, and pelvic floor dyssynergia. The medical problems of those in larger bodies will be further placed in the context of weight stigma and social justice themes.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 4 - Friday
Time
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
4/20/2018 2:00 PM
P4.1: Various Topics
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 4 - Friday
Time
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
4/20/2018 2:00 PM
P4.2: Treatment of Eating Disorders I (Child & Adolescents)
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 4 - Friday
Time
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
4/20/2018 2:00 PM
P4.3: Diagnosis, Classification, and Measurement
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 4 - Friday
Time
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
4/20/2018 2:00 PM
P4.4: Risk Factors for Eating Disorders and Other
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 4 - Friday
Time
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
4/20/2018 2:00 PM
P4.5: Neuroscience (Including Neuroimaging)
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 4 - Friday
Time
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
4/20/2018 2:00 PM
SP4.1 - Safety as an Outpatient: Assessment, Conceptualization and Treatment of Suicidal and Self-injurious Behaviors in Adolescents and Adults with Eating Disorders across Levels of Care

Speakers: Loren Prado, MS, LPC-S, Ellen Astrachan-Fletcher, PhD, CEDS, Anne Cusack, PsyD, Mindy Solomon, PhD, Michelle Lupkin, PhD

Research indicates that there is a high prevalence of suicidality and self-injury (NSSI) in both adult and adolescent populations with eating disorders. Individuals with eating disorders and NSSI also tend to have more severe presentations of eating disorder symptoms (Kostra, Journal of Eating Disorders, 2014). Within clinical samples of eating disorders, NSSI occurs with frequency estimates ranging from 13.6% to 68.1% (Svirko & Hawton, 2007). Additionally, regardless of specific diagnosis, individuals with eating disorders have strikingly high rates of suicidal ideation (SI). Adolescents with eating disorders may be particularly vulnerable to NSSI and SI behaviors, with one study showing 40.8% of a large sample reporting NSSI (Peebles et al, 2008). It is essential that clinicians working with eating disorders conduct regular and thorough assessments of suicidality and self-harm in their patients, and understand a variety of strategies for intervention with these problems (Linehan, 1993). Many eating disorder treatment centers and professionals struggle to manage NSSI and SI. Patients frequently are placed in acute hospitals to manage these symptoms, only to have their eating ignored. Frequent changes in levels of care can disrupt treatment and may lead to treatment resistance (Arcelus, Mitchell, Wales, & Nielsen, 2011). Even when suicidality and self-harm are addressed at higher levels of care, they frequently re-emerge when the patient returns to their home environment, requiring generalization of new skills to manage new dysregulating environmental cues (Muehlenkamp et al., 2009; Smyth et al., 2007). This panel will discuss all of these factors combined to address the management of suicidality and self-harm behaviors at the lowest level of care possible. This panel will outline evidence-based approaches in assessment and intervention with suicidality and self-harm, and discuss how to adapt and utilize these strategies with both acutely and chronically suicidal eating disorder patients. The speakers will explore how Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, Radically Open Dialectical Behavior Therapy, and standard best practice treatments conceptualize, assess, and manage suicidality and self-harm for both adolescent and adult eating disorder populations across levels of care.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 4 - Friday
Time
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
4/20/2018 2:00 PM
SP4.2 - International Forum on Integrated Treatment for Eating Disorder Patients with Co-morbid Substance Use Disorders: Service Delivery and Access to Care
Speakers: Amy Baker Dennis, PhD, FAED, Tamara Pryor, PhD, FAED, Umberto Nizzoli, MPH, PhD

Substance Use Disorders (especially opiate and cannabis abuse) are on the rise in North America and a significant minority of eating disorder patients present for treatment with co-morbid alcohol and/or drug problems. However, to date, very few specialized eating disorder programs, at any level of care, provide integrated treatment for this co-morbid population. The lack of availability of integrated treatment services for eating disorder patients with co-morbid substance use disorders is not only a significant issue in North America, but also a global concern. During our SIG meeting at ICED 2017 in Prague, treatment providers from Russia, Malaysia, Europe, Japan, the United Kingdom and elsewhere, discussed the lack of evidence based treatment protocols, the lack of cross-trained treatment providers and the limited access to care in their countries. The Forum will continue the discussion on how we as an international professional community can more effectively address the treatment needs of the co-morbid patient. The long-range goal of the ED/SUD SIG is to develop an international research consortium that will collaborate on finding evidence based protocols for our dual diagnosed patients.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 4 - Friday
Time
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
4/20/2018 2:00 PM

Educational Session Selection: Session 5 - Saturday

 
SPECIAL TOWN HALL EVENT:
Gathering for Good: A Town Hall Event with the Eating Disorders Coalition for Research, Policy & Action

Moderators: Chase Bannister, MDiv, MSW, LCSW, CEDS, Jillian Lampert, PhD, MPH, RD, LD, FAED

The primary mission of the Eating Disorders Coalition for Research, Policy & Action (EDC) is to advance the recognition of eating disorders as a public health priority throughout the United States. The EDC is proud to represent its members and stakeholders-including national organizations such as NEDA, AED, iaedp, REDC, and the Alliance for Eating Disorders Awareness-in vital dialogue with the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of the United States government, acting as a central conduit for federal advocacy on eating disorders.

In this town hall event, members of the EDC Board of Directors will briefly outline the recent work of the EDC, such as the successful inclusion of eating disorders policy in the 21st Century Cures Act-marking the first mention of eating disorders in the history of federal law.

A core belief of the EDC is that effective advocacy starts with effective listening. The central component of the town hall will be devoted to looking forward together, engaging participants in conversation about policy and legislative issues of consequence to all whose lives are touched by eating disorders illness.

As an interactive session, participants are encouraged to bring and share ideas, perspectives, possibilities, and hopes with the EDC as it formulates priorities and critical pathways for federal advocacy on behalf of the field. Lend your voice and join the conversation - you are invited, and there's a place at the table for you!
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 5 - Saturday
Time
9:45 AM - 11:15 AM
4/21/2018 9:45 AM
W5.1 - Incorporating Mindfulness into Eating Disorder Research and Treatment.

Speakers: Margarita Sala, MA, Irina Vanzhula, BA, Adrienne Juarascio, PhD, Kristine Vazzano, PhD, Cheri Levinson, PhD

Mindfulness is paying attention on purpose to present-moment experiences with an attitude of acceptance and non-judgmental awareness (Baer et al., 2006; Kabat-Zinn, 1994). Mindfulness-based interventions have been shown to be effective in the treatment of various psychological disorders, including eating disorders (e.g., Kristeller et al., 2014). This workshop will teach strategies for incorporating mindfulness into eating disorder research and treatment. The workshop will begin with a discussion on the definition of mindfulness (5 minutes). Afterwards, one panelist (Sala) will present background research on mindfulness and how it relates to eating disorders. She will also present her findings on how mindfulness differs in individuals with eating disorders and controls, as well as on how trait mindfulness relates to eating disorder psychopathology (5 minutes). A second panelist (Juarascio) will present her experiences in developing treatments for eating disorders that incorporate mindfulness elements, commenting on how to incorporate mindfulness into standard behavioral treatment for eating disorders (10 minutes). Afterwards, participants will have a discussion on directions for future research (5 minutes). Afterwards, three panelists will present real-world examples of mindfulness-based treatment options that clinicians can use when working with individuals with eating disorders. One panelist (Vazzano) will present on the use of mindfulness meditation in the treatment of eating disorders, specifically anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, as well as how she approaches the topic of mindfulness with patients (10 minutes). Another panelist (Levinson) will present on the use of mindfulness-based stressed reduction in the treatment of eating disorders (5 minutes). A third panelist (Vanzhula) will present on the use of mindful eating in the treatment of binge eating disorder (10 minutes). As part of this portion of the presentation, participants will engage in experiential mindfulness exercises (e.g., mindful eating, mindfulness meditation) (30 minutes). Afterwards, participants will have a discussion on how they can incorporate mindfulness in the treatment of eating disorders (5 minutes). Finally, workshop participants will have an opportunity to ask questions (5 minutes).
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 5 - Saturday
Time
9:45 AM - 11:15 AM
4/21/2018 9:45 AM
W5.2 - Why Go It Alone? How Family-based Treatment of Young Adults with Anorexia is Possible and Productive in Reaching a Full Recovery

Speakers: Rebecka Peebles, MD, Therese Waterhous, PhD, RDN, CEDRD, Tabitha Farrar, BsC, Rachel Millner, PsyD, CEDS

Historically, adult treatment models for anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa rely on individual and group therapy and the therapeutic relationship in motivating change. Parents and significant others are often asked to support treatment on the sidelines. Additionally, many providers feel uncomfortable navigating the roles of parents and family in treatment. This is often compounded by older paradigms which assert that parental attachment and enmeshment can play a role in the development of the eating disorder. Finally, adult treatment models often rely so much on working 'with' patients that the treatment benchmark goals are set lower and there is often a standard of being 'less ill' rather than truly 'well.' This presentation will explore ways in which parents and family members are often well-equipped to support restoring age-appropriate independence by being involved in care. We will provide an overview of Family Based Treatment (FBT), and discuss what we know from the research on FBT. We will share two personal stories of recovery from anorexia utilizing a FBT informed approach, and share clinical case examples of using this approach with adults. We will discuss what elements of FBT need to be changed when working with adults, and what aspects are consistent in treatment regardless of age. We will explore common concerns when using a FBT informed approach with adults, and brainstorm ways to leverage parent support in treatment in a way that honors adult autonomy as it re-emerges after being stolen by the disease. Presenters include a psychologist, recovery coach, adolescent and young adult physician, and a dietitian all with expertise in treating these disorders in adults. Two presenters have recovered from anorexia using a FBT informed approach, and one has supported their young adult child in recovering. This presentation will include a combination of didactic learning, personal and clinical examples, facilitated discussion, and time for questions and answers.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 5 - Saturday
Time
9:45 AM - 11:15 AM
4/21/2018 9:45 AM
W5.3 - From Clinical Practice to Brain Research and Back - Anxiety in the Assessment and Treatment of Eating Disorders

Speakers: Walter Kaye, MD, Heather Hower, MSW, LICSW, QCSW, ACSW, Guido Frank, MD

Various manifestations of anxiety are very common in eating disorders (EDs). Often, anxiety is present in childhood, before the onset of an ED, is exacerbated during illness, and persists after recovery. Exaggerated anxiety is thought to predict poor outcome. In addition, there is little evidence that medications thought to be helpful for reducing anxiety (e.g., benzodiazepines) are useful in ED related fears. In the past decade, there has been a substantial increase in understanding how behavior is encoded in the brain in humans and animals. In turn, this is leading to new insights into neurobiological (brain) mechanisms underlying anxious behaviors in humans. As we learn more about how the brain works, there will be new ways of describing how behavior is encoded in neurons. Still, it is important to recognize that humans have limited ways of expressing symptoms. For example, there are many different causes (e.g., tumor, virus, bacterial) of a cough. Each requires a different treatment approach. Similarly, anxiety may reflect many different brain mechanisms. In particular, we will discuss new insights into constructs thought to be encoded in neural circuits that may contribute to anxiety. We will also examine whether constructs (e.g., sensitivity to loss, uncertainty, novelty, change, or punishment; altered prediction error, exaggerated anticipation of consequences, fear), reflect similar or different neural mechanisms. In addition, we will consider whether perfectionism and self-control play a compensatory role. Finally, we will explore how this information is enabling better targeting of behavioral and medication approaches to treating such symptoms. This workshop will use an introductory to intermediate format to review symptoms experienced in ED, and how they may be explained by new insights into neurobiological mechanisms. This workshop targets front-line clinicians who have little background knowledge about how the brain encodes behavior.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 5 - Saturday
Time
9:45 AM - 11:15 AM
4/21/2018 9:45 AM
W5.4 - #EDHack: Social Media and Start up Thinking and Strategies for Clinicians, Research, and Knowledge Translation

Speaker: Zali Yager, PhD

Drawing on the theme of 'innovation' for ICED 2018, this workshop will follow the format of a mini 'hack-a-thon', to inspire clinicians, researchers, and other professionals to innovate in this field. Traditionally used for software development and coding, a hack-a-thon is where people from different disciplines and backgrounds come together to collaborate intensively to create innovative solutions to common problems. This workshop will begin with an overview of the ways that researchers and clinicians can use blogs, social media, and start up thinking to innovate and meet their practice goals. The presenter will use her recent Body Positive Mums Project, and research blog to illustrate the opportunities in this space. Working in groups, participants will then bring their knowledge around eating disorder prevention, treatment, and research to brainstorm and develop innovative potential solutions to the big issues in the body image and eating disorders field. Participants will pitch and share their ideas with the group. Those attending will therefore develop an understanding of potential processes, tools, and strategies that they could use to innovate on their return to their workplace, and will also extend their network of collaborators in this field.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 5 - Saturday
Time
9:45 AM - 11:15 AM
4/21/2018 9:45 AM
W5.5 - Examining Evidence for Medication Efficacy for Children and Adolescents with Eating Disorders - An Essential Update for Clinicians

Speakers: Wendy Spettigue, MD, FRCP(C), Mark Norris, MD, FRCP(C), Jennifer Couturier, MD, FRCP(C), Leanna Isserlin, MD, FRCP(C)

Psychotropic medications are commonly prescribed to children and adolescents with eating disorders (EDs) without sufficient evidence to guide practice. There are substantial challenges involved with gold standard medication trials for the treatment of EDs, especially in the pediatric population, and as such, many questions remain unanswered. The goal of the present workshop is to highlight the results of a recently completed systematic review of the literature examining the efficacy of psychotropic medications for the treatment of pediatric EDs. As well, our findings from a recently completed trial involving olanzapine for youth with anorexia nervosa will be reviewed and used to highlight the many challenges that researchers face in their attempts to answer such important questions. Using results from the systematic literature review, the authors will present outcomes of relevant medication trials in this population, employing a user-friendly format which will help ensure attendees will be left with an improved awareness of the existing evidence for the role of psychotropic medications in the treatment of youth with EDs. The authors will focus on the evidence for the role of SSRIs, SNRIs, mood stabilizers, benzodiazepines and antipsychotic medications for treating children and adolescents with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder and ARFID. In addition, the authors will present results from their own chart review of clinicians' use of SSRIs for treating youth with EDs. This workshop promises to offer an excellent balance of 40 minutes devoted to relevant evidence-informed treatment information, combined with 50 minutes reserved for case examples, questions to and from the audience, anecdotes from clinical experience, and lively discussions of evidence versus practice, suitable for clinicians at every stage of practice.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 5 - Saturday
Time
9:45 AM - 11:15 AM
4/21/2018 9:45 AM
P5.1: Prevention
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 5 - Saturday
Time
9:45 AM - 11:15 AM
4/21/2018 9:45 AM
P5.2: Treatment of Eating Disorders I (Child and Adolescents)
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 5 - Saturday
Time
9:45 AM - 11:15 AM
4/21/2018 9:45 AM
P5.3: BED and Obesity
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 5 - Saturday
Time
9:45 AM - 11:15 AM
4/21/2018 9:45 AM
P5.4: Personality and Cognition
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 5 - Saturday
Time
9:45 AM - 11:15 AM
4/21/2018 9:45 AM
P5.5: Diagnosis, Classification, and Measurement
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 5 - Saturday
Time
9:45 AM - 11:15 AM
4/21/2018 9:45 AM
P5.6: Gender, Ethnicity, and Culture
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 5 - Saturday
Time
9:45 AM - 11:15 AM
4/21/2018 9:45 AM
SP5.1 - Biological Research on Eating Disorders: Moving the Field Forward

Speakers: Karen Mitchell, PhD, Zeynep Yilmaz, PhD, Laura Berner, PhD, Katherine Dunlop, BSc, Sarah Fischer, PhD, Jessica Baker, PhD, Christina Wierenga, PhD

Eating disorders (EDs) are multifactorial disorders, with biological, psychological, and social factors contributing to their onset and maintenance. Currently, only approximately 50% of patients achieve symptom remission following psychotherapy for EDs, and we have few effective pharmacological treatments, underscoring the need for biological research on EDs that has the potential to lead to therapeutic advances. This panel discussion will present an overview of cutting-edge genetic and neuroimaging research on EDs. Three speakers will review new methods, and two will focus on new tasks and constructs in biological eating disorders research. (1) Dr. Yilmaz will discuss methods for and recent results of polygenic risk scores for EDs. (2) Dr. Berner will review non-food specific interceptive anticipation and processing as a novel neural marker of anorexia and bulimia nervosa. 3) Dr. Dunlop will discuss innovative combinations of neuromodulation with fMRI to reveal neurobiological mechanisms and predictors of treatment response. 4) Dr. Fischer will discuss the integration of fMRI with ecological momentary assessment (EMA) as an exciting new method to elucidate the pathophysiology of eating disorder symptoms. 5) Finally, Dr. Baker's presentation will discuss the applicability and usefulness of including biomarkers in eating disorders research and the potential for identifying novel biomarkers. In particular, she will discuss the potential utility of biomarkers in treatment outcome research and the potential translatability of these findings. Dr. Wierenga will discuss the potential for these exciting methods in biological research on EDs to move the field forward.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 5 - Saturday
Time
9:45 AM - 11:15 AM
4/21/2018 9:45 AM
SP5.2 - Standardized Assessment in Residential and Partial Hospital Eating Disorder Programs: How Are We Doing and How Should We Measure It?

Speakers: Heather Thompson-Brenner, PhD, FAED, Evelyn Attia, M.D., FAED, Kelly Bhatnagar, PhD, Scott Crow, MD, FAED, Hallie Espel-Huynh, MS, Angela Guarda, MD, FAED, Michael Lowe, PhD, Keegan Walden, PhD, Douglas Bunnell, PhD, FAED

Researchers, advocates, third-party payers, and the press have called for more rigorous assessment and transparent reporting of outcomes in residential and partial hospital (PH) programs for eating disorders (Attia, Marcus, Walsh, & Guarda, 2017). Though this goal is essential, the challenges are numerous. Common research instruments were not developed or validated for intensive settings, where eating and behavioral symptoms are structurally regulated. Full consideration and assessment of all interacting psychological and physiological, transdiagnostic outcomes is complex, particularly as lengthy intake/discharge procedures already burden patients. Post-discharge follow-up assessments are crucial, however, follow-up attrition is typically high. Despite these challenges, a number of residential/PH programs have successfully implemented standardized assessments over the past decade, with important lessons now emerging for the field. First, a research expert will introduce the importance of this topic from a scientific and ethical standpoint. Next, the leadership from one program that recently implemented a quality improvement/clinical outcomes battery will present an overview of their challenges and solutions. Research consultants from another program will present results from multiple years of assessment of interacting physiological and psychological variables, including outcome at discharge and follow-up, as well as within-treatment weekly assessment and mediators of change. Next, a researcher at a third program will present data pertaining to the definition of positive and negative outcomes for intensive treatment, and the relationship between outcome and emotional changes over the course of treatment. Finally, a clinical leader in the field will comment on the relationship between multi-modal intensive treatment, standardized outcome assessment, and evidence-based practice in coming years. Interactive discussion will follow panel presentations.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 5 - Saturday
Time
9:45 AM - 11:15 AM
4/21/2018 9:45 AM

Educational Session Selection: Session 6 - Saturday

 
W6.1 - Learning How to Apply Compassion Focused Therapy for Eating Disorders (CFT-E) in an Outpatient Group Setting

Speakers: Clodagh Dowling, MSC, DClin Psych, SC, and Jillian Doyle, MSC, DClin Psych

Learning how to apply Compassion Focused Therapy for Eating Disorders (CFT-E) in an outpatient group setting Compassion Focused Therapy for Eating Disorders (CFT-E) is a novel approach to the treatment of Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa and Binge Eating Disorder and Other Specified Eating Disorder for those with high levels of self -criticism and shame. The CFT-E model incorporates both a biological and psychological treatment proposing that; by increasing self -compassion and learning new ways to manage painful emotions and thoughts, self- criticism and shame will decrease leading to a reduction in eating disorder behaviours and symptoms. The purpose of this workshop is to map how the theory and model of CFT-E is applied in an adult outpatient group setting. The workshop will begin by outlining the model with particular reference to the development of self and other relating, in adults with an eating disorder before this group intervention (15 minutes). CFT-E techniques will then be demonstrated and attendees will be invited to practice the skills and participate in role plays. Skills will include; developing compassionate breathing techniques and imagery as well as cultivating self-compassion using emotional awareness and exposure skills (60 mins). How to integrate these techniques in clinical practice will be explored and discussed with attendees. Finally research findings of changes in how participants related to self and others following this group intervention will be highlighted (15 minutes).

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 6 - Saturday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/21/2018 11:15 AM
W6.2 - Stakeholders United: Tools for Promoting Productive Partnerships between Professionals, Patients, and Carers Based on the AED's World Eating Disorders Healthcare Rights

Speakers: Dasha Nicholls, MD, FAED, MBBS, MRC(Psych), Judy Krasna, BA, Ashley Solomon, PsyD, Mirjam Mainland, MS
< Patient and carer support and empowerment have been identified as key elements in the outcome of eating disorder treatment, and are beginning to receive elevated attention in our field. World Eating Disorders Healthcare Rights is an innovative document developed by the AED's Patient/Carer Committee in an effort to promote excellence in eating disorders care by leveraging patient, carer, and professional partnerships. It offers a global blueprint to help guide patients, carers, and professionals by outlining seven rights for patients and families which highlight important facets of treatment. Four stakeholders from different countries will unite to present this workshop-one former patient, one parent, and two clinicians from different treatment settings. The aim of this workshop is to showcase the benefit of implementing these rights in clinical practice by viewing them through multiple lenses, representing a spectrum of stakeholders and treatment cultures. Through their varied experiential perspectives on these rights, the presenters will outline how to forge and foster these beneficial patient-carer-professional partnerships and will illustrate how these partnerships enhance and improve eating disorder treatment. The presenters will invite guided and supportive discussion among participants regarding perceived barriers to the operationalization of these principles in their own work, as well as elicit and share creative strategies for doing so. The presenters will also provide case examples and opportunities for interactive small group discussion to develop familiarity and mastery with putting the rights into action. Participants will learn not only how to use World Eating Disorders Healthcare Rights to better the practice of eating disorder treatment, but also why it is so important to do so based on the lived experience of the patient and carer presenters. Breakdown of the 90 minute time allotment: Lived experiences/examples of the impact of partnerships, short summation of research on relevance (10 min) History and development of the World Eating Disorder Healthcare Rights (5 mins) Review of each right, including explanation, case examples, barriers, and discussion (50 min) Guided small group discussions regarding implementation strategies (15 min) Summary and questions (10 min).

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 6 - Saturday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/21/2018 11:15 AM
W6.3 - Unraveling the Enigma of Male Eating Disorders: Conceptualization, Assessment, and Intervention

Speakers: Stuart Murray, DClinPsych, PhD, and Jason Lavender, PhD

There is growing recognition that an evolving array of eating disorder (ED) symptoms, including those of a muscularity-oriented nature, are more common in men than previously understood. Critically, understanding how ED psychopathology and related attitudinal (e.g., body dissatisfaction) and behavioral symptoms (e.g., excessively rigid eating or exercise routines) may differentially manifest in males is critical to accurate diagnosis, assessment, and treatment. The central aims of this workshop are to provide an overview of contemporary directions and implications of research on traditional and muscularity-oriented ED symptoms among males, as well as addressing clinical considerations related to assessment and intervention. This workshop will focus on both research and clinical perspectives regarding the nature of ED symptoms among males, including traditionally-defined and muscularity-oriented ED features. Drs. Lavender and Murray will begin the workshop with a presentation of several case vignettes involving males with ED-related symptomatology, after which attendees will break into smaller groups for discussion before returning for a broader discussion between the presenters and all attendees [~20 minutes]. Drs. Lavender and Murray will then provide a brief historical overview of EDs in males, followed by a review of more recent conceptualizations of ED psychopathology and related conditions (e.g., muscle dysmorphia) in males [~15 minutes]. The presenters will subsequently lead a discussion with attendees on factors related to unique ED presentations in males (e.g., distinct male model ideal, gender roles) [~20 minutes]. Dr. Lavender will then present on considerations and advances in the assessment of ED-related variables in males [~12 minutes], after which Dr. Murray will provide a brief overview of contemporary issues and approaches to treatment of males with ED and related psychopathology [~12 minutes]. The remaining time will be allotted for a discussion facilitated by the presenters and questions from attendees.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 6 - Saturday
Time
4/21/2018 11:15 AM - 11/21/2018 12:45 PM
4/21/2018 11:15 AM
W6.4 - Food Exposure: Three Different Approaches in the Treatment of Eating Disorders

Speakers: Heather Thompson-Brenner, PhD, FAED, Julia Cassidy, MS, RDN, CEDRD-S, Deborah Glashofer, PhD

In-session exposure to food can be an important component of treatment for eating disorders (EDs). Research has demonstrated the utility of food exposure; however, there are multiple approaches to this complex intervention. In-session exposure to foods is a common component of nutrition counseling, where clients practice eating with the dietitian with the goal of facilitating gains in ability to eat in the real world. Exposure and response prevention in this context can help address patients' resistance, sustain the therapeutic alliance, and facilitate progression toward treatment goals. Other approaches are derived from advances in in cognitive-behavioral research, where the goals are somewhat different. For example, in Exposure and Response Prevention for Anorexia Nervosa (EXRP-AN), based on EXRP for obsessive compulsive disorder, the therapist aims to increase the experience of anxiety during and following the exposure, by removing avoidance and rituals, to facilitate the development of anxiety tolerance, disconfirm a feared consequence, and promote new learning about food and anxiety (Glasshofer, Albano, Simpson, & Steinglass, 2016). In the Unified Protocol for the Transdiagnostic Treatment of Emotional Disorders (UP), food exposures are conducted with a similar goals and methods to EXRP-AN, but other emotions-such as shame, disgust, and sadness-are also explored within the context of transdiagnostic attention to EDs and comorbid disorders (Thompson-Brenner et al., 2017). In this workshop, the multi-disciplinary trainers will demonstrate these three distinct but related approaches to exposure, including their different rationales, evidence base, and application to specific cases. The training will address the integration of food exposure into various forms of counseling for clinicians from differing disciplines and theoretical backgrounds, and will include experiential exercises and interactive discussion.
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 6 - Saturday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/21/2018 11:15 AM
W6.5 - FBT-ARFID for Younger Patients: Lessons from a Randomized Controlled Trial

Speakers: Shiri Sadeh-Sharvit, PhD, Athena Robinson, PhD, James Lock, MD, PhD

Since the inclusion of Avoidant-Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) in DSM-5, more families with children and young adolescents present for services at eating disorder (ED) clinics. However, no systematic data on the best approach to treat these patients and aid their parents is yet available. ARFID affects a non-traditional ED patient population. First, many patients are younger than average ED populations. Second, ARFID patients typically present to ED clinics after a relatively longer duration of symptoms and thus, parental self-efficacy to facilitate their child's recovery may be lower than in other ED populations. Therefore, the administration of a developmentally-minded, family-inclusive, treatment for ARFID could address these unique features, ideally eliminating eating pathology before it becomes further ingrained and precipitates additional health complications. This interactive workshop will present our experience working with ARFID patients (5-12 years old) and their families in a randomized controlled trial testing family-based treatment for ARFID (FBT-ARFID). FBT inherently incorporates many treatment principles with established effectiveness in younger individuals with EDs: involving the entire family in the intervention, focusing on parental empowerment and coaching, externalizing the illness, and promoting a graduated change in the family interactions around food and eating. We will discuss considerations and adaptations to implementing important FBT components, including orchestrating an intense scene while instilling hope, holding a family meal and addressing comorbidities. Audience members will get an up-close look at FBT-ARFID administration, technique demonstration, and case reports' responsiveness to treatment. Specific workshop didactic formats will include lecture presentation (30 minutes), case reports (20 minutes), role plays, and video clips (20 minutes), as well as questions from and discussion with the audience (20 minutes).

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 6 - Saturday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/21/2018 11:15 AM
W6.6 - "But What If My Patient Gets Fat?": Research and Clinical Implications of Weight Stigma in Treating Higher-weight Patients with Eating Disorders

Speakers: Erin Harrop, MSW, Julie Church, RDN, CD, CEDRD, Hilary Kinavey, MS, LPC, CDWF, Andrea LaMarre, PhC, MSc, Janell Mensinger, PhD, Chevese Turner, BA

Eating disorders (EDs) manifest at all points on the weight continuum. Research shows that weight stigma in healthcare is correlated with decreased quality of care, including, delay of diagnosis, misdiagnosis, poor clinician rapport, healthcare avoidance, and poorer outcomes. Additionally, internalized weight stigma is linked to decreased psychological wellbeing and increased disordered eating. Unfortunately, ED clinicians are not immune to weight stigma; thus, addressing both patient and clinician weight stigma is important in ED clinical environments. This workshop will begin with a review of research on EDs diagnosed in higher weight individuals, including but not limited to atypical anorexia nervosa and binge eating disorder. Additionally, we will present primary data demonstrating how internalized weight stigma attenuates the effects of program benefits on disordered eating and other health-related behaviors. After presenting a model of healthcare avoidance based on social identity and stereotype threat, we will also feature digital stories from diverse higher-weight individuals sharing experiences with healthcare and ED treatment to give voice to those most impacted by weight stigma. Examples of how these issues present in clinical contexts will be given, and small-group discussions will be utilized to help participants collectively address the scenarios using a weight-inclusive framework. Clinical issues for discussion will include: considerations in identification and diagnosis of higher-weight eating disorders, refeeding and weight-restoration in the context of higher BMI, communicating and collaborating with other healthcare professionals, addressing weight-bias in common clinical ED interventions, advocating with insurance companies for appropriate levels of care, combating weight bias among clinicians, cultivating a weight-inclusive clinical milieu among ED treatment peers, and clinician accountability and support.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 6 - Saturday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/21/2018 11:15 AM
P6.1: Epidemiology
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 6 - Saturday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/21/2018 11:15 AM
P6.2: Treatment of Eating Disorders II (Adult)
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 6 - Saturday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/21/2018 11:15 AM
P6.3: Children and Adolescents
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 6 - Saturday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/21/2018 11:15 AM
PS6.4: Biology and Medical Complications
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 6 - Saturday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/21/2018 11:15 AM
P6.5: Innovative Uses of Technology
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 6 - Saturday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/21/2018 11:15 AM
P6.6: Risk Factors for Eating Disorders and Others
Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 6 - Saturday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/21/2018 11:15 AM
SP6.1 - Exercise and Neuropsychological Function in Eating Disorders

Speakers: Laura Moretti, MS, RD, CSSD, LDN, Amy Harrison, PhD, Lisa Smith - Kilpela, BA, MA, PhD, Carrie J McAdams, MD, PhD, Sharon Chirban, PhD, Kathryn Ackerman, MD, MPH, FACSM

The central aim of this collaborative SIG panel is to address gaps in the literature regarding the neurocognitive, emotional, and behavioral consequences of exercise and over-exercise in the context of eating disorder (ED) pathology, treatment, and recovery. The scientific basis for changes in brain physiology and cognitive function during exercise will be presented through a series of case presentations. We focus on talking to patients in ways that reflect their real-world experiences while simultaneously providing data about known changes in neurocognitive function and behavior after exercise. Specifically, alterations in cognitive and emotional function in response to moderate and exhaustive levels of exercise will be presented. Real-world examples of techniques to manage and maintain appropriate exercise levels for patients in recovery from eating disorders, including both non-athletes and athletes, will be discussed. Differences associated with recovery in the context of the cognitive demands of different forms of athletic activity will be discussed, with an emphasis on differentiating between repetitive, low-cognitively demanding exercise and athletic behaviors that require substantial attention, cognition, and learning. This session will include a moderated panel designed to facilitate dialogue between panel attendees and the expert panelists regarding the role of exercise and neurocognitive correlates in ED pathology, treatment and recovery. For instance, we will address questions such as: What do we really know about healthy levels of exercise? What defines exercise excessive and exercise addiction? What are the emotional and cognitive effects of exercise and over-exercise? How does one engage a patient to limit their exercise, and what are the neurocognitive effects of exercise reduction? Expertise from different disciplines as well as the perspective of a recovered patient-athlete, are included on the panel. Panelists will address a series of case presentations, which will be followed by discussion points facilitated by the moderator and fielding of audience questions, group and audience discussion.

Category
Educational Session Selection: Session 6 - Saturday
Time
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
4/21/2018 11:15 AM

Enhanced Registration

 
Enhance your conference experience by adding video & slides for the educational sessions presented for the duration of your registration, such as the Keynote, Plenaries, Workshops, SIG Panel Discussions, and Global Think Tank. Enhanced registration delegates are also entered into a drawing for a free full-registration for ICED 2019 in New York City!

***The purchase of this package is non-refundable. If you cancel your registration you will still be charged, and will receive the remaining contents of the Enrichment Package. Session recordings do not offer CME credit. Session availability is subject to speaker permission.
Category
Enhanced Registration
4/21/2018
Enhance your conference experience by adding video & slides for the educational sessions presented for the duration of your registration, such as the Keynote, Plenaries, Workshops, SIG Panel Discussions, and Global Think Tank. Enhanced registration delegates are also entered into a drawing for a free full-registration for ICED 2019 in New York City!

***The purchase of this package is non-refundable. If you cancel your registration you will still be charged, and will receive the remaining contents of the Enrichment Package. Session recordings do not offer CME credit. Session availability is subject to speaker permission.
Category
Enhanced Registration
4/21/2018
Enhance your conference experience by adding video & slides for the educational sessions presented for the duration of your registration, such as the Keynote, Plenaries, Workshops, SIG Panel Discussions, and Global Think Tank. Enhanced registration delegates are also entered into a drawing for a free full-registration for ICED 2019 in New York City!

***The purchase of this package is non-refundable. If you cancel your registration you will still be charged, and will receive the remaining contents of the Enrichment Package. Session recordings do not offer CME credit. Session availability is subject to speaker permission.
Category
Enhanced Registration
4/21/2018

Optional Event Participation

 
AED Mentor/Mentee Breakfast - (no additional fee)

Please follow this link to register separately

Category
Optional Event Participation
Time
7:30 AM - 9:00 AM
4/19/2018 7:30 AM
PCAC Global Lunch - (no additional fee)
Category
Optional Event Participation
Time
1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
4/19/2018 1:00 PM
Award Ceremony/Business Meeting
Category
Optional Event Participation
Time
8:00 AM - 9:30 AM
4/21/2018 8:00 AM
The Clinical Perspective on Eating Disorders Research: A Symbiotic Relationship

Session co-chairs/moderators: Kristin von Ranson, PhD (Canada) & Kelly Bhatnagar, PhD (USA) Research-Practice Committee co-chairs

As the final event of the International Conference on Eating Disorders, the Research-Practice Think Tank provides an opportunity for reflection and discussion of issues that are critical to conference attendees. The Think Tank aims to promote research-practice integration (RPI) in our field. Rather than the usual focus on how to integrate research-informed evidence into clinical work, the 2018 Think Tank will focus on how to integrate a clinical perspective into research. This year's session will include 3 discussants (a recovered patient/advocate discussant, a full-time clinician, and a clinician-investigator). After the co-chairs introduce the topic, each panelist will speak briefly on how they use clinical knowledge to inform research; practicalities and limitations of integrating clinical expertise into research; or personal experiences with clinical research protocols; as well as any comments they have on research-practice integration at ICED. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions and exchange views regarding research-practice integration.

Category
Optional Event Participation
Time
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM
4/21/2018 4:00 PM
VIP Reception Tickets - ***The VIP Receiption is NOT included in any registration option above. All registrants and guests must have a ticket to attend.
Category
Optional Event Participation
Time
6:00 PM - 7:00 PM
4/21/2018 6:00 PM
Guest Closing Social Event Tickets - A Taste of Chicago ***Select this option only if you did not select the Spouse/Guest Registration Fee. Only select this option for additional guests you would like to attend that where not registered.
Category
Optional Event Participation
Time
7:00 PM - 11:59 PM
4/21/2018 7:00 PM

Research Training Day - STUDENTS ONLY

 
Research Training Day Registration (STUDENTS ONLY) - Participation in the AED Research Training Day on Wednesday, April 18th, requires a separate registration fee. This session is open to students and will feature various workshops from 2pm-6pm.

***Select this option ONLY if you selected FULL conference registration above. If you selected only to attend the RTD in the registration options above you do not need to select this option.

Title: RTD 1.1 Conducting Quantitative Eating Disorder Research: From Planning to Publication

Speakers: Stephen Wonderlich, PhD, FAED, Ross Crosby, PhD, FAED, Markus Moessner, PhD

The aim of this workshop is to provide a comprehensive review of the critical steps involved in the planning, preparation, conduct, and publication of quantitative eating disorders research. The topics to be addressed in this workshop include: (1) formulating research questions; (2) designing your research study; (3) choosing assessment measures for your study; (4) regulatory issues, including dealing with Institutional Review Boards, (5) data collection and management; (6) statistical analysis and interpretation; and (7) manuscript preparation. The presenters will provide overviews of each of the areas, as well as supplemental materials with additional information. Ample time will be provided for question and answer sessions. Attendees will be encouraged to discuss their own research projects.

Category
Research Training Day - STUDENTS ONLY
Time
2:00 PM - 6:00 PM
4/18/2018 2:00 PM

SIG Annual Meeting Lunch Options

 
I want to purchase a SIG Annual Meeting Box Lunch - Thursday (optional)
Category
SIG Annual Meeting Lunch Options
Time
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
4/19/2018 1:00 PM
I want to purchase a SIG Annual Meeting Box Lunch - Friday (optional)
Category
SIG Annual Meeting Lunch Options
Time
12:45 PM - 1:45 PM
4/20/2018 12:45 PM

SIG Annual Meetings - April 19

 
SAM 1.1: Bariatric
Category
SIG Annual Meetings - April 19
Time
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
4/19/2018 1:00 PM
SAM 1.2: Body Image and Prevention
Category
SIG Annual Meetings - April 19
Time
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
4/19/2018 1:00 PM
SAM 1.3: Family Based Treatment
Category
SIG Annual Meetings - April 19
Time
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
4/19/2018 1:00 PM
SAM 1.4: Genes & Environment
Category
SIG Annual Meetings - April 19
Time
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
4/19/2018 1:00 PM
SAM 1.5: Medical Care
Category
SIG Annual Meetings - April 19
Time
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
4/19/2018 1:00 PM
SAM 1.6: Psychodynamic & Integrated Psychotherapies
Category
SIG Annual Meetings - April 19
Time
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
4/19/2018 1:00 PM
SAM 1.7: Neuroimaging
Category
SIG Annual Meetings - April 19
Time
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
4/19/2018 1:00 PM
SAM 1.8: Patient/Carer
Category
SIG Annual Meetings - April 19
Time
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
4/19/2018 1:00 PM
SAM 1.9: Somatic & Somatically Oriented Therapies
Category
SIG Annual Meetings - April 19
Time
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM